From June 13 to June 25, 2014

 

Exhibition. Kerry James Marshall: painting and other stuff

Kerry James Marshall, Better Homes, Better Gardens, 1994. Denver Art Museum Collection: Funds from Polly and Mark Addison, the Alliance for Contemporary Art, Caroline Morgan, and Colorado Contemporary Collectors: Suzanne Farver, Linda and Ken Heller, Jan and Frederick Mayer, Beverly and Bernard Rosen, Annalee and Wagner Schorr, and anonymous donors, 1995.77 © Kerry James Marshall Photograph courtesy of the Denver Art Museum

Kerry James Marshall, Better Homes, Better Gardens, 1994. Denver Art Museum Collection: Funds from Polly and Mark Addison, the Alliance for Contemporary Art, Caroline Morgan, and Colorado Contemporary Collectors: Suzanne Farver, Linda and Ken Heller, Jan and Frederick Mayer, Beverly and Bernard Rosen, Annalee and Wagner Schorr, and anonymous donors, 1995.77 © Kerry James Marshall Photograph courtesy of the Denver Art Museum

The exhibition Kerry James Marshall: Painting and Other Stuff, currently being presented in Spain in the Museo Reina Sofía and Fundació Antoni Tàpies, is the result of a shared project between four European contemporary art institutions.

A key figure in contemporary art, the work of Kerry James Marshall (Alabama, 1955; currently resident of Chicago), emerges in response to a “lack in the image bank” that reflects different aspects related to blackness in the West. Therefore, Marshall undertakes work where representation becomes more urgent and legitimates the contextualisation of Afro-American cultural and social identity, often ironically and sharply criticising the historical contexts he lives in.

The exhibition in the Museo Reina Sofía, with over sixty works on view, primarily focuses on his pictorial work prior to the year 2000, and includes some of the series of paintings that are key to the work Marshall produced in the 1990s, for instance the Garden Project series and those paintings that explore the theme of beauty, where the artist questions aesthetic models, both in art and in women.

Date: 13 June - 26 October 2014
Location:
Palacio de Velázquez, Retiro Park
Organised by:
M HKA (Antwerp), Kunsthal Charlottenborg (Copenhagen), Fundació Antoni Tàpies (Barcelona) and Museo Reina Sofia (Madrid)

 

Related Activity. Encounter with Kerry James Marshall

Coinciding with the opening of the exhibition Kerry James Marshall: Painting and Other Stuff, an encounter with the artist will be held on 13 July. Marshall will present his work in this activity, whilst also reflecting on the assumed neutrality of the canon in art history and the absence of certain themes that characterise his painting, such as civil rights and persisting stereotypes.

Date: 13 June 2014
Location:
Nouvel Building, Auditorium 200
Time:
7 p.m.
Admission:
Free, until full capacity is reached
Organised by:
Museo Reina Sofia

 

Film series. Sounds in Diaspora. The Cinema of the Black Audio Film Collective

Black Audio Film Collective. Handsworth Songs. Film, 1987. Courtesy of the Black Audio Film Collective and LUX, London

Black Audio Film Collective. Handsworth Songs. Film, 1987. Courtesy of the Black Audio Film Collective and LUX, London

Active in the UK between 1982 and 1998, the Black Audio Film Collective symbolised a radical attempt to transform education, institutions and the representation of black identity in independent film, with their work condensing a complex palimpsest of voices found between nascent politics of representation and shifts in the working class movement. Behind the group made up of John Akomfrah, Lina Gopaul, Avril Johnson, Reece Auguiste, Trevor Mathison, David Lawson and Edward George, there was not only a transformation in audiovisual imagery, but also the search for a new public culture based on difference. Their films, new to documentary practices, would progressively encompass discordance and fragments that meant speaking from the outside, searching for knowledge and a space for the invisible.

Over five sessions, Sounds in Diaspora runs through a key project in the critique of the colonial past and present. The series gets under way with one of the few screenings of Signs of Empire and Images of Nationality, two critiques of imperial reasoning, and concludes with The Last Angel of History, an Afro-futuristic consideration of alienation in black popular music. Other examples like Handsworth Songs, Twilight City and Who Needs a Heart exercise a language that attempts to reintegrate the body and experience in images.

Date: 2, 3, 9, 10 and 16 July 2014
Programme: Check website
Location: Sabatini Building, Auditorium
Time: 7 p.m.
Admission: Free, until full capacity is reached
Organised by: Museo Reina Sofía