List of selected artworks. Maps for the tour in the museum

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  • Salvador Dalí. Visage du Grand Masturbateur (Face of the Great Masturbator), 1929. Painting. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía Collection, Madrid
    1 october, 1991 - 2 december, 1991

    The surrealist movement, definitely visible and theoretically debated with the publication of the Manifeste du Surréalisme (1924), written by André Breton (Tinchebray, France, 1896 - Paris, 1966) is a cosmology organised by and about Breton himself. His revolutionary pretensions, which are visible in all his publications, expositions and determinations, are understood as the will of general subversion (through action) in all areas of daily life, starting from poetry and art and moving to ethics, religion and politics. Thus, Surrealism is not only an artistic and literary expression, but a stance against the traditional values of culture and the bourgeois society and against realism in art. He supports the idea of an inner model in all creative acts, of otherness, absolute automatism (applied to poetic and artistic practice) as well as the adoption of meta-artistic methods that come from psychoanalysis, such as hypnosis, which allow the release of human consciousness and a return to a primitive and primordial state of thought.

  • Exhibition view. Brassaï. Del surrealismo al informalismo, 1994
    30 may, 1995 - 25 september, 1995

    The work of Brassaï, the pseudonym of Gyula Halász [Brassó, Hungary (now Romania), 1899 - Beaulieu-sur-Mer, France, 1984], is considered a crucial part of the visual culture and modern poetry that comes out of Paris in the interwar years. Following a period in Berlin, Brassaï settles in the French capital in 1924, with the city and the marginalised inhabitants alienated from established conventions quickly becoming the focal point of his work.

  • Exhibition view. Fotografía pública / Photography in Print 1919-1939, 1999
    27 april, 1999 - 29 june, 1999

    During the interwar years photography develops in Europe as a language of its own, different and independent from traditional arts where possible, both in objectivity and in experimentation. In a period of just two decades artistic photography is perfected (dependant on models of traditional arts) and there is an increase in photojournalism, subordinate to present and immediate feedback. This results in the drift of modern photography towards photojournalism and photographic documentation: Farm Security Administration in the United States, Mass Observation in the United Kingdom, Misiones Pedagógicas (Educational Missions) in Spain, as well as the proliferation of photographic magazines that connect specifically with the mass media, such as Life and Fortune. This exhibition brings together an extensive collection of works, names and media -about a thousand pieces by artists from around the world: photographers, designers, editors, photography editors, poster and publicity artists- over which this era of experimentation is forged as well as the maturity of the technique. Studying it results in the emergence of new issues, in the spirit of the time (technical, city, body, work, abstraction or propaganda) and the appearance of an entire network of spreading and distribution of images and publications due to technical advances in the publishing industry. In these years new ways of communication specific for or dedicated to the publishing of photographs arise: yearbooks, photo-books, newspapers, posters or advertisements, in such a way that modern photography is made public and expands its horizons of consumption, favouring, conversely, mass culture.

  • Exhibition view. Universo Gaudí, 2002
    15 october, 2002 - 6 january, 2003

    To mark Antoni Gaudí’s (Reus, 1852 - Barcelona, 1926) 150th anniversary the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía and the Centro de Cultura Contemporánea de Barcelona are recreating in this extensive exhibition the universe of the central figure in Catalan Modernism and architect of international prestige. This exhibition is a journey through the influences, history, creative works and impact of Gaudí's work on a wide outlook built through more than four hundred works ranging from the early nineteenth century until the mid-twentieth century.

  • Exhibition view. Dalí. Cultura de masas, 2004
    28 june, 2004 - 30 august, 2004

    In the early twentieth century art expresses a rejection of the rules on which Western mimetic representation had been built while also absorbing the techniques and themes that arose with the advances of the Industrial Revolution. These two trends are developed in parallel; they intertwined and influenced each other.

  • Man Ray. Les larmes (Tears), 1932 / posthumous print, 1982. Photography. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía Collection, Madrid
    30 may, 2007 - 22 july, 2007

    Coinciding with the festival of photography PHotoEspaña 2007, the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía proposes a selective journey through photographs from its Collection. The selection of photographs shown in five different spaces and that have been established according to a reflexive link between the subjective perception of the spectator and the return of the look in the image.

  • Exhibition view. ATLAS. How to carry the world on one’s back?, 2010
    November 26 - March 28, 2011

    ATLAS

    How to carry the world on one’s back?

    Atlas is a proposal to put the frame of thought introduced by German art historian Aby Warburg (1866-1929) into the context of historical knowledge and images. This is not a monographic exhibition on Warburg, but a journey through the history of images from 1914 until the present day, where warburgism constitutes the genius loci.

  • Exhibition view. A Hard, Merciless Light. The Worker Photography Movement, 1926-1939, 2011
    April 6 - August 22, 2011

    A Hard, Merciless Light

    The Worker Photography Movement, 1926-1939

    A Hard, Merciless Light. The Worker Photography Movement, 1926-1939 examines the period during the history of 20th century photography in which photography joined forces with various worker movements (ranging from trade unionism to the creation of “workers' states” like the Soviet one), motivated by growing working-class consciousness and the idea of taking over the means of production and reproduction of images. By looking at the artistic avant-garde in its interconnection with the political avant-garde, this exhibition challenges hegemonic historiography that focuses primarily on other movements arising in the history of photography, such as the New Vision. The exhibition displaces the importance of mechanical vision and instead considers photography's relationship with social movements, shifting the debate toward photography as a document. It presents photographs (many of which are vintage copies), films and other documents, with special attention being paid to periodicals, the fundamental medium for the circulation of images and the ideas associated with them during these years.

  • Vasily Kandinsky. Succession, 1935 © Vassily Kandinsky, VEGAP, Madrid, 2012
    October 3, 2012 - January 7, 2013
  • Dorothea Tanning, Chambre 202, Hôtel du Pavot, 1970. Instalation. Musée national d'art moderne - Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. © Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Georges Meguerditchian © VEGAP, Madrid, 2013
    November 27, 2013 – March 31, 2014

    Biographical forms

    Construction and individual mythology

    The dichotomy between creative practices and life has been one of the main themes of historical-artistic reflection over the centuries.

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