List of selected artworks. Maps for the tour in the museum

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Related El pueblo español tiene un camino que conduce a una estrella (maqueta) (There Is a Way for the Spanish People That Leads to a Star [Maquette])

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  • Benjamín Palencia. Figuras, 1930. Painting. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía Collection, Madrid
    18 october, 1994 - 9 january, 1995

    The exhibition entitled El surrealismo en España (Surrealism in Spain) takes a look back at the output in Spain, between 1925 and the Civil War (1936-1939), of almost fifty artists. The period is defined by, or evolves alongside, French Surrealism. Lucía García de Carpi, the exhibit's joint curator with Josefina Alix, points to two factors that cause so-called Spanish Surrealism to gain so much importance. The first being that within the revival of avant-garde art, the artists start to take an active interest in what is being disseminated by the Surrealists in Paris, going beyond the mere receptive nature of European movements. The second involves an heterogeneous style in Spain in terms of language and conception. Their theoretical, literary, exhibiting and artistic approaches bring at least four locations into the spotlight: Madrid (the residency of students and “Telluric” Surrealists Alberto Sánchez and Benjamín Palencia), Catalunya (the ADLAN Group and Logicofobista Group), Tenerife (the setting for Gaceta del Arte, Óscar Domínguez and the International Surrealist Exhibition organisation in 1935) and Zaragoza (Tomas Seral y Casas and Alfonso Buñuel).

  • Alberto. Maternidad (Maternity), 1930. Sculpture. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía Collection, Madrid
    26 june, 2001 - 17 september, 2001

    Alberto Sánchez (Toledo, 1895 - Moscow, 1962) - known as Alberto - is one of the preeminent artists in the Spanish avant-garde movement. He starts out in the School of Vallecas alongside Benjamín Palencia, but moves away after the Civil War, first to Valencia and then later to the Soviet Union. Despite producing a large part of his work in exile, where he sees out the rest of his days, Alberto is a key figure in Spanish art.

  • Maruja Mallo. Tierra y excrementos (Earth and Excrement), 1932. Painting. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía Collection, Madrid
    16 september, 2003 - 24 november, 2003

    La Sociedad Estatal de Conmemoraciones Culturales (SECC) (The State Society for Cultural Commemorations) and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía celebrate the centenary of the birth of Rafael Alberti (Puerto de Santa Maria, 1902-1999) with this major exhibition on one of the most universal Spanish poets. The exhibition is the largest project among the scheduled to commemorate the centenary of the poet’s birth, being the first exhibition on the writer that completely defines his life and his art. Peeking into the life of Rafael Alberti is to participate in the turbulent twentieth century that influenced the life course and literary career of one of the most prominent members of the Generation of 27. To recreate this scenario, close to a thousand pieces have been selected, including manuscripts, first editions and translations of his books, personal objects and photographs, as well as correspondence with Pablo Neruda, Federico García Lorca and Manuel Altolaguirre.

  • Óscar Domínguez. Retrato de la pianista Roma (Portrait of the Pianist Roma), 1933. Painting. On loan
    6 july, 2004 - 18 october, 2004

    The exhibition Huellas Dalinianas reflects Salvador Dalí’s (Figueras, 1904-1989) influence on the Spanish avant-garde, from 1929 until after the Civil War. This exhibition is part of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía’s programme celebrating the centenary of the birth of Catalan artist, which is accompanied by another almost simultaneous exhibition at the Museum, Dalí. cultura de masas.

See past exhibitions