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  • Der Arbeiter Fotograf. Neuer Deutcher Verlag. Berlin, N. 10, 1929. Illustrated magazine. Biblioteca y Centro de Documentación. Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía. Madrid
    24 agosto - 30 noviembre, 2011
    Program: Biblioteca y Centro de Documentación

    This exhibition features a selection of magazines acquired on the occasion of the exhibition A Hard, Merciless Light. The Worker-Photography Movement, 1926-1939. The magazines show the link between documentary expression and working-class consciousness, exploring the importance of images in the founding of a new political and social ideal and suggesting that the struggle for power begins with the struggle for representation.

    Biblioteca y centro de documentación
  • Vista de sala de la exposición. Elena Asins. Fragmentos de la memoria, 2011
    June 15 - October 31, 2011

    Elena Asins

    Fragments of Memory

    The work of Elena Asins (Madrid, 1940) reflects both the constructive tradition of 20th century avant-garde movement and as well as practices arising out of the computation and information theory of the 1960s.

  • Exhibition view. Lili Dujourie. Nature's Lore, 2011
    June 10 – September 25, 2011

    Lili Dujourie

    Nature's Lore

    In the tradition of the Flemish primitives, the body of work by Lili Dujourie (Roeselare, Belgium, 1941) establishes an intellectual and sensory connection with the viewer, at the same time that it presents a critical reflection on specific ideas and categories in art history.

  • Vista de sala de la exposición. Leonor Antunes. walk around there. look through here, 2011
    June 10 - September 5, 2011

    Leonor Antunes

    walk around there. look through here

    Program: Fisuras

    The sculptural interventions of Leonor Antunes (Lisbon, 1972) build their meaning from within their dense materiality, without making reference to a specific symbolic content, transforming the places in which they are installed and making visible the tensions and energy that exist in such places. Her work vindicates the material autonomy of forms and also a certain autonomy of meaning, the strength of the pure gesture. Notions such as measure, scale or proportion also play a key role. For Antunes, who lives and works in Berlin, restriction is something that articulates her proposal. Like artists such as Duchamp,

  • Exhibition view. Maja Bajevic. To Be Continued, 2011
    May 27, 2011 – October 3, 2011

    Maja Bajevic

    To Be Continued

    Maja Bajevic (Sarajevo, 1967) bases her work on a poetic and subtle review of historical and social fractures, which involves awareness of the spectator as an agent or audience alike.

  • Exhibition view. Lygia Pape. Magnetized Space, 2011
    May 25 – October 3, 2011

    Lygia Pape

    Magnetized Space

    The work of Lygia Pape (1927-2004) arose in a setting very much characterised by a spirit of renewal. In Brazil, one of the most innovative art contexts in the second half of the 20th century, the tensions inherent in the arrival of modernism coexisted with the opposite extreme: dictatorships, false economic miracles and cultural movements based on local considerations, yet doomed to live in exile.

  • Exhibition view. James Castle. Show and Store, 2011
    May 18 – September 5, 2011

    James Castle

    Show and Store

  • Exhibition view. Yayoi Kusama, 2011
    May 11 - September 12, 2011

    The work of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama (Matsumoto, 1929) unfolds in the international art scene that began at the end of the 1950s and is the origin of today's globalisation. Her career, spanning almost six decades, started with her earliest solo exhibitions at the age of just 23, in Japan. She crossed international borders in 1958, heading for New York, which by that time was the unquestioned epicentre of art worldwide.

  • Exhibition view. Leon Golub, 2011
    May 6 - September 12, 2011

    The art of Leon Golub (Chicago, 1922 - New York, 2004) challenges the dominant model of the development of art from the 1950s onward. Oblivious to the media experimentation taking place in most artistic production during these decades, Golub's work is based on a pictorial renovation in which genres believed to be exhausted, such as historical painting or portraits, once again show unexpected expressive and critical capacity.

  • Exhibition view. A Hard, Merciless Light. The Worker Photography Movement, 1926-1939, 2011
    April 6 - August 22, 2011

    A Hard, Merciless Light

    The Worker Photography Movement, 1926-1939

    A Hard, Merciless Light. The Worker Photography Movement, 1926-1939 examines the period during the history of 20th century photography in which photography joined forces with various worker movements (ranging from trade unionism to the creation of “workers' states” like the Soviet one), motivated by growing working-class consciousness and the idea of taking over the means of production and reproduction of images. By looking at the artistic avant-garde in its interconnection with the political avant-garde, this exhibition challenges hegemonic historiography that focuses primarily on other movements arising in the history of photography, such as the New Vision. The exhibition displaces the importance of mechanical vision and instead considers photography's relationship with social movements, shifting the debate toward photography as a document. It presents photographs (many of which are vintage copies), films and other documents, with special attention being paid to periodicals, the fundamental medium for the circulation of images and the ideas associated with them during these years.

  • Exhibition view. Roberto Jacoby. Desire Rises from Collapse, 2011
    February 25 - May 30, 2011

    Roberto Jacoby

    Desire Rises from Collapse

    Program: Fisuras

    The work of Roberto Jacoby (Buenos Aires, 1944) moves constantly through areas on the very edge of artistic production. Ever since his early years as an artist linked with the famous Instituto Di Tella, which led to the mythical and revolutionary Tucumán Arde (1968), his work has been understood as a never-ending expansion of the notion of artistic activity. Among other tasks, he has written lyrics for the well-known glam rock group, Virus, he has studied sociology and political theory and he has worked as a theatre critic and as a journalist for the underground press. Such versatility has made systematic exhibition of his work a complicated endeavour, something to which this exhibition hopes to put an end.

  • Vista de sala de la exposición. Asier Mendizabal, 2011
    February 9 - May 2, 2011
    Program: Fisuras

    In large part the work by Asier Mendizabal (Ordizia, 1973) history ceases to be a practice connected to the past and instead reveals the cracks through which history becomes an activity intimately linked to the present. His enigmatic work, not easily deciphered, turns anecdotes into an event that makes the past current; a past in which the history of art and the ideology of shape have a fundamental weight that refers back to their link with social groups and their use as a tool for identification, glorification or repudiation. The media he uses, even considering the weight of Basque sculpture over the 20th century, reveal a range of resources that suggest readings far from reflection on space or the artistic medium and that are thus presented in a way that rejects all metaphysics.

  • Vista de sala de la exposición. Efrén Álvarez. Económicos, 2011
    February 2 - May 30, 2011

    Efrén Álvarez

    Económicos

    Program: Fisuras
  • Vista de sala de la exposición. Dorit Margreiter. Descripción, 2011
    January 12 - April 25

    Dorit Margreiter

    Description

    For over a decade, the artist Dorit Margreiter (Vienna, 1967) has been reflecting on modern architecture, on its preservation and its destruction, and on the relationship between visual systems and the economic and social contexts of architecture. Her activity shows a connection with that of a generation of Austrian artists, such as Florian Pümhosl, Martin Beck and Mathias Poledna, who, with the specific condition of the artistic medium as their point of departure, meditate on recent history and on the social and political weight of modernity, thus diluting its formal specificity.

  • Vista de sala de la exposición. Miroslaw Balka. ctrl, 2010
    November 26 – April 25

    Miroslaw Balka (Warsaw, 1958) came to maturity at a time when certain factions in his native Poland, notably elements in the Catholic Church and in Solidarity, the independent trade union, were beginning to confront the repressive Soviet regime that had prevailed since the end of the Second World War. In the mid-1980s he graduated from the conservative Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw with a body of work that obliquely referenced this turbulent socio-political context. A number of related figurative sculptures, that included Black Pope and Black Sheep, 1987, soon followed. By the beginning of the Nineties, as a more liberal, democratic climate evolved in the aftermath of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Balka’s work underwent a marked change. An abstract iconography, that related to the body through forms of measurement and proportion, replaced the representational imagery he had formerly favoured. Although space as much as the objects that occupy it now became a primary preoccupation, his abiding concerns have nonetheless remained constant: above all, an acuity to the ways that history shapes and governs the present. Since he feels the weight of history as an inevitability, his work is imbued with its shifting valencies. Everyday I walk in the paths of the past, he said in a recent interview, contemporary time does not exist (1).