List of selected artworks. Maps for the tour in the museum

Preview

Search

Activities

Results

  • Rea Tajiri. History and Memory, 1991
    20 september, 1995 - 7 october, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Wanderers: Reflections on Exile is a video programme that ‘upsets’ the relationship maintained with Spain and the identity of individuals in society, looking at the margins to take stock of the occasional pleasures and evils that result from different types of exile: physical exile, made up of political exiles, refugees, self-declared ex-pats, immigrants and ‘perpetual travellers’ and mental exile, made up of insane, alienated, depressed, marginalised, unconscious and creative people.

  • Jordi Teixidó / Mal Pelo. Mundana, 1995
    10 may, 1995 - 3 june, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Choreographing for the Camera is a film, video and conference series on the concept of video dance that includes audiovisual pieces somewhere between dance, film and video created by directors, choreographers and dancers working together. To reconstruct the process since Merce Cunningham and Nam June Paik made their first video dance piece, it is important to remember that modern dance and film have been conjoined since the outset and have had cyclical moments of intense collaboration. The appearance of video - the tool closest to avant-garde movements - at the time of the ascendency of the creation of contemporary dance in the United States and Europe rekindled a desire to experiment among choreographers. The possibility of participating in the great communicative power of audiovisual media tempted many young choreographers who found new staging spaces and new ways of reaching in the public in images. The 1980s were a golden age for video dance productions, especially in France and Belgium, where public institutions decisively supported their creators. Festivals and shows like the Centre Pompidou’s Video Danse and competitions like Grand Prix and Dance Screen organised by the International Music + Media Center (IMZ), became meeting points for the profession and a thermometer of the quality and quantity of productions in the genre, and also revealed the growing interest of television programmers. It was during these years as well that video dance began to appear in Spain: La Mostra de Video-Dansa in Barcelona was a driving force, not only from the point of view of dissemination, but also in terms of production in the country. In Madrid, festivals like Madrid en Danza provided annual grants, while the Metrópolis (TVE) and Piezas (Canal+) programmes regularly broadcast national and international video dance programmes.

  • Luis Canicio. Ombligo, 1993
    6 april, 1995 - 29 april, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Computer-generated images and interactive virtual reality systems, both products of a graphic evolution in images and the historical development of the interaction between artist, artwork and viewer, have heralded a complete transformation in traditional art practices. Everything Flows: Spanish Computer Graphics is a collection of videos that illustrate this important transformation in Spain through a selection of some of the most outstanding works of the last ten years, from the first computer-generated piece by Juan Carlos Eguillor (San Sebastian, 1947 - Madrid, 2001) to works made in the sphere of virtual reality by Águeda Simó and telematic projects by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (Mexico City, 1967).

  • Cerith Wyn Evans. Degrees of Blindness, 1988
    1 march, 1995 - 25 march, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On This Side of the Channel: British Video Art is a retrospective made up of four programmes of video art, computer animation and other creative works produced for commercial television in the British Isles that stand out from other electronic works because of their originality and the quality. Spanning a quarter century (from the first formal experiments to recent projects using more sophisticated technology), this programme presents a revealing record of British artists who have used electronic media to make important, vibrant creations as an alternative to commercial television. The first set of works, grouped under the title A Brief History of British Video Art: 1975 - 1990, offers a historical overview of video art projects that includes works by David Hall (Leicester, 1937), Jeremy Welsh (Gateshead, 1954), Mona Hatoum (Beirut, 1952) and Keith Piper (Malta, 1960); the second, New British Video: 1990 - 1994, focuses on a short period of four years to highlight the richness of the most recent work, including pieces by Michael Curran (Scotland, 1963), Steve Hawley, Andrew Stones (Sheffield, 1960) and Terry Flaxton (London, 1953); while A Brief Introduction to British Computer Animation: 1968 - 1994 returns to a more extended timeframe to spotlight the most important examples from the world of computer graphics, almost from its very beginnings. The programme starts off with some of the first experimental projects done in the domain of computer-animated images, featuring artists like Tony Pritchett (England, 1938), Stan Hayward (England, 1930) and Darrell Viner (Coventry, 1946 - London, 2001), and ends with some truly surprising and sophisticated technological pieces, exemplified by Alan Schechner, William Latham (England, 1961) and Andrew Budd. Finally, the works grouped under the title Virtual Television focus on a highly innovative group of electronic pieces that were either especially produced for or premiered on British television, such as First Direct, directed by Marc Ortmans, A Short History of the Wheel (1993) by Tony Hill (London, 1946) and Stooky Bill (1990) by David Hall.