List of selected artworks. Maps for the tour in the museum

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  • Chip Lord, Branda Miller y Muntadas. Media Hostages, 1985
    13 march, 2005 - 19 march, 2005
    Cinema and video Film series Encounter

    The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía presents a retrospective of the work of Chip Lord (Cleveland, 1944) a pioneer in video creation in the United States and co-founder of the art and architecture collective Ant Farm, created to map the American psyche of the 1940s and 50s without losing sight of the rapid technological changes of the post-war period. The works done by Ant Farm, whose members (co-founder Doug Michels and Curtis Schreier and Hudson Marquez, who joined later) came from the field of architecture, treated the media in a way that differed significantly from other video collectives in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Decidedly interdisciplinary, the group produced works that combined performance art, media language, sculpture and graphic and architectural design and usually exhibited the countercultural ideology of the era with a free-and-easy sense of humour.

  • Bill Morrison.The Mesmerist, 2003
    4 november, 2004 - 12 december, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Encounter

    This year, Film and Almost Film presents 33 pieces, most of which were created between 2002 and 2004 by visual artists and Spanish and international filmmakers.

  • Ulrike Ottinger. Freak Orlando, 1981
    12 may, 2004 - 3 june, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Encounter

    This series is dedicated to the work of artist, photographer and director Ulrike Ottinger (Konstanz, 1942), one of the most emblematic figures of the New German Cinema, paradoxically overlooked by official histories. Ottinger began working in film in the 1960s (during which time she studied photography, history and ethnology at the side of teachers including John Friedlaender, Claude Lévi-Strauss and Pierre Bourdieu), although she did not make her first film as a director until 1972, when she directed Laocoon & Sons with Tabea Blumenschein (Konstanz, 1952). The film premiered at the Deutsche Kinemathek in Berlin in 1973. With Madame X - Eine absolute Herrscherin (1977), a film about a female pirate, Ottinger revealed her interest in questions of gender, although in the 1980s she distanced herself from traditional feminist paradigms to interrogate the existence of a ‘female’ aesthetic, an alternative way of seeing the world, and begin to explore new discourses about identity. Her Berlin Trilogy marked a critical moment in this turn, since in it she tackled questions like androgyny and dandyism using a somewhat queer sensibility. From this point of view, Ottinger’s work has the special distinction of re-appropriating the aesthetics of narcissism from a feminist discourse, proposing a renegotiation of subjectivity and going beyond the more traditional debates in feminist theory on gender and sexuality.