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Cinema and Video

The audiovisual programs are intended to counteract the predominant model of the black cube, even at a time in which both film and video have become fully integrated and dissolved into contemporary art museums. Their aim is to explore the projected image using different formats and discourses: historical series that broaden – and question – the narrations told by the Collection, retrospectives that draw attention to other stories in the audiovisual history and programs that examine the close links that film and video have with contemporary artistic practices. At the same time, this programming seeks to define a space for film and video outside of the usual circuits, describing itineraries distinct from the spectacle and its derivatives.    

Results

  • Matt Mullican. Untitled (Matt Mullican under hypnosis: Zürich). Performance, 2004
    November 12, 2013 - 7:00 p.m.
    Cinema and video Conference Performance art

    In this performative lecture, in parallel with the presentation of Minimal Resistance. Between late modernism and Globalisation: artistic practices during the 80s and 90s, Mullican reviews and comments on some of his performances under hypnosis, in which he recreates, as he does in his visual works, the logic of an unstable and irrational world.

  • Antoni Mercader. En torno al vídeo, 1980
    24 may, 2011 - 27 may, 2011
    Cinema and video Film series Conference
  • Allan Sekula. The Forgotten Space, 2010
    4 may, 2011 - 5 may, 2011
    Cinema and video Conference Screenings

    This film highlights the invisibility of global labour even in the process of production. The sea, writes Allan Sekula, is forgotten until disaster strikes. The sea, formerly the object of romantic imagination, is examined from a new angle, that of the transport of merchandise in times of globalisation.

  • Archipiélago Val del Omar
    21 march, 2011 - 27 march, 2011
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Although they span the area between the avant-garde and the neo-avant-garde, the film and audiovisual activities of José Val del Omar have taken place in the territory of myth. Myth as something situated outside of history, that only leads to cult status.

  • silencio. Homenaje a las víctimas de la Guerra Civil y la represión franquista
    16 march, 2011 - 21 march, 2011
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The film representation of the Spanish Civil War and its victims has changed over the different historical periods between 1936 and today.

  • Los Hijos. Los Materiales, 2009
    9 december, 2010 - 17 december, 2010
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The Limits of Cinema is a series of screenings, meetings and debates designed to provide a space to reflect on the nature of the cinema, its boundaries and its interactions with other forms of expression.

  • Bruce Conner. Easter Morning, 2008
    10 november, 2010 - 18 november, 2010
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    In a career that spanned more than half a century, Bruce Conner (Kansas, 1933-San Francisco, 2008) worked in nearly every medium of the fine arts.

  • Antoni Miralda y Benett Rossell. París, La Cumparsita, 1972
    4 october, 2010 - 7 october, 2010
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    To mark the occasion of the exhibition Miralda. De gustibus non disputandum (24 June -11 October 2010), the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía is presenting three video programmes by the artist Antoni Miralda (Tarrasa, 1942) that explain his view of art in the context of the exhibition.

  • Joan Jonas. Songdelay, 1973. Cortesía Electronic Arts Intermix, Nueva York
    9 june, 2010 - 24 june, 2010
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    During the 1970s, a time of intensive de-industrialisation and the transition to an information economy in New York, artists found new ways to use the city. The creative use of abandoned and peripheral spaces intensified, especially in Lower Manhattan, which was becoming a centre of the commercial art world. Action Behind the Margins combines debates, performances pieces and film screenings to reveal a city where public and private spheres intermingle and marginal subjects assert their right to the city.

  • Iván Zulueta. Arrebato, 1980
    19 may, 2010 - 28 may, 2010
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Since the 1950s, Spain has been home to an important tradition of experimental film cut off from conventional exhibition spaces. This series was designed to give this unknown branch of film the visibility it deserves. From more than a thousand films, forty-three were chosen to be screened at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in six sessions. In order to spark a dialogue between the different eras, this vastly diverse group of seminal films was shown out of chronological order, blazing a trail through the almost unknown history of Spanish cinema.

  • Egon Bunne. Everything Changes, 1990
    15 march, 2010 - 29 march, 2010
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Transitland: video art from Central and Eastern Europe 1989-2009 is a project put together to mark the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. It includes a selection of one hundred works produced between 1989 and 2009 that reflect the political, social and personal transformations that occurred in post-socialist Central and Eastern Europe.

  • Harun Farocki y Andrei Ujica. Videogramme einer Revolution , 1992
    14 october, 2009 - 12 december, 2009
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Singular Multitude: The Art of Resistance is an ambitious series that includes conferences, a performance piece and a selection of audiovisual works that reflect the desire of their creators to investigate the unlimited possibilities found on the edges of official taste and the socio-political circumstances of the present day, all while recalling events, revealing traumas, mediating memory and producing counterimages in contemporary society and art.

  • Glauber Rocha. O Patio, 1958
    18 may, 2009 - 15 june, 2009
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Visionaries - Audiovisual Works in Latin America is an eclectic exhibition that is full of vitality and deeply committed to audiovisual creation in Latin America. The series looks at Latin American experimental video and film from Mexico to the countries of the Southern Cone in a combination of screenings and conferences that put everything from pioneers in experimental film to more recent productions under the historical lens. Organised by Brazil’s Instituto Itaú Cultural, the series consists of 73 works grouped into nine programmes.

  • Sanja Iveković. Personal Cuts, 1982
    13 april, 2009 - 15 april, 2009
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Fragments of the East. Performance Art and Feminist Discourse (1968-1989) is a video and conference series on the origin of feminist discourse in the artistic practice in three historical contexts with no public sphere. As artists beginning within the framework of the communist dictatorships of Romania, the former Yugoslavia and Poland, Geta Brătescu (Ploiesti, 1926), Sanja Iveković (Zagreb, 1929) and Ewa Partum (Grodzisk, 1945) created works that question artistic specificity and autonomy at the same time that they allude to repressive contexts and the subject’s capacity for transformation and representation in works of art.

  • Jack Smith, foyer de la película Flaming Creatures, 1963. Cortesía The Plaster Foundation
    22 september, 2008 - 23 october, 2008
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    New York, February 1963. Jack Smith (Columbus, 1932 - New York, 1989), Tony Conrad (Concord, 1940), and Henry Flynt (Greensboro, 1940) protest outside the Met, MoMA and Lincoln Center carrying signs that read: “Demolish Serious Culture! Demolish Art Museums! Demolish Concert Halls!” “Making art was never supposed to be easy. It really has to be very boring. It must become very, very boring.”

  • Ola Simonsson y Johannes Stjärne Nilson, Music for One Apartment and Six Drummers. Cortesía de Kostr-film, Estocolmo.
    5 march, 2008 - 30 march, 2008
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Why not short films? is a series of screenings and a roundtable designed to put the spotlight on the short film format, a form that reveals the new relationships that artists and filmmakers have with the audiovisual medium and the world around them from the perspective of young, mainly Spanish creators who have come to short films from the cinema. The Great Ways agency, a specialist in cultural events for twelve years, collaborated on the selection.

  • Jan Verbeek. Osmotic, 2006
    4 october, 2007 - 21 october, 2007
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    In 1984, a group of students in the city of Bonn founded the Videonale, a video festival that reflected the creative possibilities of the medium. After more than 20 years, this festival has become one of the most important and innovative international events dedicated to contemporary video. Despite its age, the Videonale remains faithful to its principles: the free participation of artists in the competition with a single-channel piece made during the two years before the call for entries, its international character, and selection by a jury of independent international experts.

  • Jean-Luc Godard. Moments Choisis des Histoire(s) du Cinéma,2004
    13 june, 2007 - 17 july, 2007
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Film or cinematic essays - not to be confused with art-house cinema - is the film correlative to the long tradition of the literary essay. These films do not offer a dramatic narrative (like fictional films) or a representation of the historical world (like documentaries), but are a reflection on the medium. This programme constitutes the first presentation in Spain (and one of the first in Europe) of one of the least codified practices in the contemporary audiovisual field. The films selected make it possible to characterise the film essay and observe its evolution over the last decade by comparing works by filmmakers such as Jean-Luc Godard (Paris, 1930), the artist who has done the most to popularise this form, and Mariano Llinás (Buenos Aires, 1975); personal documentary makers like Ross McElwee (North Carolina, 1947) and Albertina Carri (Buenos Aires, 1973); avant-garde filmmakers such as Barbara Hammer (Hollywood, 1939) and Angela Melitopoulos (Munich, 1961); and video artists like Shelly Silver (New York, 1957), Sean Snyder (Virginia Beach, 1972) and Deborah Stratman (Washington, D.C., 1967).

  • Nadine Khan. One in a Million, 2006
    28 may, 2007 - 4 july, 2007
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    No Coverage (the title alludes to the proliferation of Arab television channels over the last few decades and how they have chosen to ignore the production of independent video, thus leaving it literally with no coverage) brings together independent experimental videos and documentaries by artists in order to shake up, discredit and reconstruct the limits of experimental video and documentaries in the Middle East. Comprised of videos that include autobiographical stories, testimonial interviews, archive footage and socio-political topics, the goal of the programme is to put Middle East independent video practices into context and explore the characteristics of their evolution. Although it is difficult to precisely define what constitutes ‘independent video’ and ‘experimental documentary’ in the region, the programme shows clearly that both encompass a broad spectrum of aesthetic perspectives and forms.

  • Andres Duque. Paralelo 10, 2005
    17 may, 2006 - 24 june, 2006
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Contemporary Madness was designed to clear up the hazy boundary separating the reality of perception from the rules of exception, featuring audiovisual creations that present the darker areas of the social order and the human mind using non-fiction and documentary work done in Spain. The works show the invisibility of the limits established by the discourses sanctioned by civil ordinances and medical and political convention.

  • Peter Hujar. Susan Sontag,1975
    17 april, 2006 - 28 april, 2006
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The love that Susan Sontag (New York, 1933-2004) felt for the cinema (and showed with her participation on selection committees for festivals and programmes for film series around the world, as well as the creation of her own films) is especially manifest in her untiring defence of filmmakers like Jean-Luc Godard (Paris, 1930), Chris Marker, Ingmar Bergman and Jack Smith, to name just a few, when their work needed to reach a broader, more appreciative audience (and in the case of Smith, be given legal protection). This series pays tribute to Sontag’s legacy to film culture, establishing a dialogue between films and documentaries by and about Susan Sontag with the works of some of these filmmakers.

  • Peggy Ahwesh. The Deadman,1989
    2 march, 2006 - 23 march, 2006
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía is dedicating a retrospective to the work of Peggy Ahwesh (Pittsburgh, 1954), one of the most groundbreaking and irreverent filmmakers of the American underground. Ahwesh began to make films in the early 1980s, projecting all of the effervescence of punk into her work. According to Eileen Myles, the Kodak Company would return each roll of developed film to her with a patient explanation that that they “had done it wrong”. Like Andy Warhol, Ahwesh gave her actors complete freedom in the field, but did impose some cut-off limits never imagined by the creator of Sleep (1963), to whom Ahwesh paid tribute with The Fragments Project (1985-1995).

  • Jem Cohen. Chain, 2004
    10 november, 2005 - 18 december, 2005
    Cinema and video Film series Conference
  • Gerald Fox. Marc Quinn: Life Support, 2000
    19 may, 2005 - 5 june, 2005
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Since its earliest days, British television has served as a reference point for creative dialogue between contemporary art and television. As early as 1938, the artist and critic John Piper (Epsom, 1903; - Fawley Bottom, 1992) was appearing in a studio to talk about modern art. Today, the means of broadcast and reception have become decentralised and fragmented. Television as the supreme medium of directed mass culture is in decline and its audience, which was once captive, is dispersed among hundreds of satellite and cable channels, DVDs, videogames and 3G mobile phones. The moment when leisure time was filled with the great cultural television projects that so distinguished the second half of the 20th century will not be repeated. Remote Control features a selection of some of the most historical moments in the history of the relationship between art and television.

  • Kai Sibley. Retrato de Stan Brakhage en un café de Boulder, Colorado, 2001
    14 october, 2004 - 31 october, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Stan Brakhage: in Search of the Sublime

  •  Trinh T. Minh-ha. Naked Spaces - Living is Round, 1985
    19 january, 2004 - 30 january, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This film and video programme presents the complete filmography of the Vietnamese filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha (Hanoi, 1952), one of the most forceful voices in post-colonial and post-feminist discourse in the 1980s and 90s. Born in Hanoi, she moved to the United States in 1970, where she studied music composition, ethnomusicology and French literature at the University of Illinois. Her film work has been highly recognised in the field of documentary, where she has adopted a critical ethnographic eye with respect to the narrative of the traditional documentary, which she deconstructs in her films. The technique of documentary film often contains the illusion of offering an objective and impartial look at the observed subject. The filmmaker, like the anthropologist, usually enjoys a privileged position, a distance above the observed subject that supposedly guarantees the neutrality of the process and the document. Part of Trinh T. Minh-ha’s work consists of challenging this proposition, revealing the strategies and methods used in the specific relationships between the documentary maker and the exploited or oppressed subjects who are observed in a hieratical power structure with an underlying authoritarian discourse about the ‘other’. In her films, meaning is constructed, not given. Thus she shows that commentary is not impartial, but rather an interpretation open to all its inherent complexity.

  • Sharon Lockhart. Nô, 2003
    13 november, 2003 - 19 december, 2003
    Cinema and video Film series Conference
  • Kirby Dick y Amy Ziering Kofman. Derrida, 2002
    22 may, 2003 - 24 may, 2003
    Cinema and video Screenings Conference
  • Harun Farocki. Auge / Maschine I, 2001
    24 october, 2002 - 15 november, 2002
    Cinema and video Film series Conference
  • Stephen y Timothy Quay. In Absentia, 2000
    13 november, 2001 - 19 december, 2001
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Film and Almost Film 2001 presents a selection of 22 works by experimental film directors and artists who, influenced by film and television, have taken a new approach to their work in an attempt to create a new genre of ‘art film’. This genre has traditionally been linked, both in terms of technique and narrative, to European experimental film, which, produced with low or medium budgets, has tried to reorient film practices and aesthetics. Nonetheless, in the last few years, the connotations inherent in the idea of ‘art film’ have grown.

  • Lodela, 1996. Coreografía: José Navas. Dirección: Philip Baylanc
    7 may, 1997 - 7 june, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On the occasion of the International Dance Festival in Madrid, In Two Dimensions: Dance on the Screen is a series that features an international selection of film-video-dance dedicated to the auteur. The pieces included in the seven programmes in the series were made by renowned artists who present different ways to contemplate audiovisual creation, finding their partenaire in the choreographic arts. Choreographers and directors analyse, structure, observe and direct the viewer’s gaze through the body and the movement of performers who order/disorder ideas and feelings. Moreover, each is done in a personal way, paving often extremely divergent paths, where the relationship between the two resources materialises for very different reasons.

  • Jean Cocteau. La Sang d'un Poéte, 1930
    9 april, 1997 - 3 may, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The series Of Blood, of Pleasure and of Death… presents a selection of experimental films with gay and lesbian themes designed to show some of the key pieces of avant-garde and underground film, putting them into context and in relation to the mass culture that generated them. The series title, in part inspired by the film trilogy by Gregory Markopoulos (Toledo, 1928 - Freiburg, 1992) Du sang, de la volupté et de la mort (1947-1948) acts as a metaphor for a series of films that, like the work by Markopoulos, see ‘blood, pleasure and death’ as an imaginary place where the desire, pain and the annihilation of the body are confronted and its being is oppressed by social norms and sexual taboos. The second part of the title, Some Films on ‘Sexual Disorientation’, in turn, relates to the confirmation of a fact: gay and lesbian film did ‘not’ exist before the 1970s or if it existed, it was limited to only two or three works. Given that the idea of a group or concept of gay and lesbian identity based on the term sexual ‘orientation’ did not exist (it emerged in the 1970s), this body of films cannot easily be described using those terms. This does not mean to say that there were no sexually ambiguous films suggesting ‘strange’ desires or ‘disoriented’ artists and filmmakers. Hundreds of films featured homosexual characters, but very few were made by homosexuals and even fewer had a gay or lesbian content.

  • Gordon Matta-Clark.  Splitting, 1974
    12 march, 1997 - 30 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This film and video series presents an overview of the film work of the North American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (New York, 1943-1978), an oeuvre that was largely forgotten for a long period of time. Beginning early in the 1970s until his death in 1978, Matta-Clark was one of the main driving forces on the New York SoHo art scene, characterised by his experiments aimed at breaking the limits that define an artwork, altering the structures established in the art world and exploding numerous means of artistic expression.

  • Peter Fordham. Yoko Ono y John Lenon filmando Imagine, 1970
    5 february, 1997 - 1 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This series is dedicated to the film work of Yoko Ono (Tokyo, 1933), sixteen films made between 1966 and 1982 that fill a unique space in the history of independent film in the United States. Yoko Ono participated in a general assault on film conventions during an extraordinarily creative period in American culture, during which directors developed alternative forms of production, distribution and exhibition. Coming from the same complex set of interdisciplinary experiences that inspired performance art and objects during those years, Ono’s films are like her songs (with their characteristic abstract expressivity) and like her artworks and sculptures because they too focus on materials in such a way that they expose the very phenomenon of perception.

  • Rea Tajiri. History and Memory, 1991
    20 september, 1995 - 7 october, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Wanderers: Reflections on Exile is a video programme that ‘upsets’ the relationship maintained with Spain and the identity of individuals in society, looking at the margins to take stock of the occasional pleasures and evils that result from different types of exile: physical exile, made up of political exiles, refugees, self-declared ex-pats, immigrants and ‘perpetual travellers’ and mental exile, made up of insane, alienated, depressed, marginalised, unconscious and creative people.

  • Jordi Teixidó / Mal Pelo. Mundana, 1995
    10 may, 1995 - 3 june, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Choreographing for the Camera is a film, video and conference series on the concept of video dance that includes audiovisual pieces somewhere between dance, film and video created by directors, choreographers and dancers working together. To reconstruct the process since Merce Cunningham and Nam June Paik made their first video dance piece, it is important to remember that modern dance and film have been conjoined since the outset and have had cyclical moments of intense collaboration. The appearance of video - the tool closest to avant-garde movements - at the time of the ascendency of the creation of contemporary dance in the United States and Europe rekindled a desire to experiment among choreographers. The possibility of participating in the great communicative power of audiovisual media tempted many young choreographers who found new staging spaces and new ways of reaching in the public in images. The 1980s were a golden age for video dance productions, especially in France and Belgium, where public institutions decisively supported their creators. Festivals and shows like the Centre Pompidou’s Video Danse and competitions like Grand Prix and Dance Screen organised by the International Music + Media Center (IMZ), became meeting points for the profession and a thermometer of the quality and quantity of productions in the genre, and also revealed the growing interest of television programmers. It was during these years as well that video dance began to appear in Spain: La Mostra de Video-Dansa in Barcelona was a driving force, not only from the point of view of dissemination, but also in terms of production in the country. In Madrid, festivals like Madrid en Danza provided annual grants, while the Metrópolis (TVE) and Piezas (Canal+) programmes regularly broadcast national and international video dance programmes.

  • Luis Canicio. Ombligo, 1993
    6 april, 1995 - 29 april, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Computer-generated images and interactive virtual reality systems, both products of a graphic evolution in images and the historical development of the interaction between artist, artwork and viewer, have heralded a complete transformation in traditional art practices. Everything Flows: Spanish Computer Graphics is a collection of videos that illustrate this important transformation in Spain through a selection of some of the most outstanding works of the last ten years, from the first computer-generated piece by Juan Carlos Eguillor (San Sebastian, 1947 - Madrid, 2001) to works made in the sphere of virtual reality by Águeda Simó and telematic projects by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (Mexico City, 1967).

  • Cerith Wyn Evans. Degrees of Blindness, 1988
    1 march, 1995 - 25 march, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On This Side of the Channel: British Video Art is a retrospective made up of four programmes of video art, computer animation and other creative works produced for commercial television in the British Isles that stand out from other electronic works because of their originality and the quality. Spanning a quarter century (from the first formal experiments to recent projects using more sophisticated technology), this programme presents a revealing record of British artists who have used electronic media to make important, vibrant creations as an alternative to commercial television. The first set of works, grouped under the title A Brief History of British Video Art: 1975 - 1990, offers a historical overview of video art projects that includes works by David Hall (Leicester, 1937), Jeremy Welsh (Gateshead, 1954), Mona Hatoum (Beirut, 1952) and Keith Piper (Malta, 1960); the second, New British Video: 1990 - 1994, focuses on a short period of four years to highlight the richness of the most recent work, including pieces by Michael Curran (Scotland, 1963), Steve Hawley, Andrew Stones (Sheffield, 1960) and Terry Flaxton (London, 1953); while A Brief Introduction to British Computer Animation: 1968 - 1994 returns to a more extended timeframe to spotlight the most important examples from the world of computer graphics, almost from its very beginnings. The programme starts off with some of the first experimental projects done in the domain of computer-animated images, featuring artists like Tony Pritchett (England, 1938), Stan Hayward (England, 1930) and Darrell Viner (Coventry, 1946 - London, 2001), and ends with some truly surprising and sophisticated technological pieces, exemplified by Alan Schechner, William Latham (England, 1961) and Andrew Budd. Finally, the works grouped under the title Virtual Television focus on a highly innovative group of electronic pieces that were either especially produced for or premiered on British television, such as First Direct, directed by Marc Ortmans, A Short History of the Wheel (1993) by Tony Hill (London, 1946) and Stooky Bill (1990) by David Hall.

  • Juan Hidalgo. Una acción Zag, 1993. Foto: J. Antonio Mula
    11 october, 1994 - 4 november, 1994
    Cinema and video Conference Performance art

    The Action

  • Industrial Light & Magic. The Mask, 1994
    28 september, 1994 - 15 october, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Cyberculture is upon us. It is the last movement of the 20th century. Its supporters are the first cyberspace nomads: a heterogeneous group of visionary scientists, hackers, computer-fan musicians and digital image artists. Their interests range from high technology to virtual games, from hypertext to smart drinks, from cyberpunk literature to the Internet and brain implants. Their motto: Information must be free! Art Futura ’94: Cyberculture is a video and conference programme designed to draw attention to this new and fascinating universe.

  • Paul McCarthy y Mike Kelley. Heidi, 1992
    1 june, 1994 - 18 june, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    New Trends from the World Wide Video Festival 1993-1994 is a single-channel video programme that brings together a selection of works representative of the dominant trends at the 12th World Wide Video Festival, a very broad - though always random - review of the immense diversity found today in multimedia art. Within the variety inherent in the programme, it is possible to identify some larger trends. Many of the works reveal a desire for political commitment, a motif that has become stronger in recent years as many of the artists have become obsessed with the changes in the world, especially in the Eastern Bloc and China. There is also a tendency to mix an artist’s images with earlier ones, as well as an important increase in elements from performance pieces and videos based on performance art. An upsurge in documentary-type productions made by and about artists from a very personal point of view is also notable. Finally, many of the works in this selection share an autobiographical intent.

  • Nam June Paik. A Tribute to John Cage, 1973-1976
    2 february, 1994 - 26 february, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    1993 marks 30 years since the spring-summer of 1963 when Nam June Paik (Seoul, 1932 - Miami, 2006) inaugurated his Exposition of Music-Electronic Television at the Galerie Parnass in Wuppertal. Having acquired a mythical aura over the years, the event is considered to represent the birth of the electronic arts today. This video programme reflects recent investigations in the field, which have made it possible to recover and publically present some of Paik’s ealiest work - particularly his experimental films, early videos and the first intermedia audiovisual explorations - now rescued from the oblivion in which they lay for 30 years.

  • Montxo Algora, Brad Degraf, Michael Wahrman. PAU, 1990
    20 october, 1993 - 4 november, 1993
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Art is like blood: it has to flow continually to stay alive. When the media through which it is expressed do not expand, its only alternative is to find new channels that almost magically lift it to a higher level. Art Futura ’93/Retrospective ’90-92 is a video and conference programme that presents some of the most important pieces and contributions to the field from works seen over the four years of Art Futura, an annual art and technology programme that came to life in Barcelona in the 1990s. It four sessions, dedicated respectively to Virtual Reality (1990), the Cybermedia (1991), the Global Mind (1992) and to Artificial Life (1993) have been guided by the idea of “scratching the future”, of building a space for artists’ ideas and expressions that, by their very nature, do not fit into the categories established by art institutions, as especially occurs in the case of those that make use of the new technologies.