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  • Lodela, 1996. Coreografía: José Navas. Dirección: Philip Baylanc
    7 may, 1997 - 7 june, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On the occasion of the International Dance Festival in Madrid, In Two Dimensions: Dance on the Screen is a series that features an international selection of film-video-dance dedicated to the auteur. The pieces included in the seven programmes in the series were made by renowned artists who present different ways to contemplate audiovisual creation, finding their partenaire in the choreographic arts. Choreographers and directors analyse, structure, observe and direct the viewer’s gaze through the body and the movement of performers who order/disorder ideas and feelings. Moreover, each is done in a personal way, paving often extremely divergent paths, where the relationship between the two resources materialises for very different reasons.

  • Jean Cocteau. La Sang d'un Poéte, 1930
    9 april, 1997 - 3 may, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The series Of Blood, of Pleasure and of Death… presents a selection of experimental films with gay and lesbian themes designed to show some of the key pieces of avant-garde and underground film, putting them into context and in relation to the mass culture that generated them. The series title, in part inspired by the film trilogy by Gregory Markopoulos (Toledo, 1928 - Freiburg, 1992) Du sang, de la volupté et de la mort (1947-1948) acts as a metaphor for a series of films that, like the work by Markopoulos, see ‘blood, pleasure and death’ as an imaginary place where the desire, pain and the annihilation of the body are confronted and its being is oppressed by social norms and sexual taboos. The second part of the title, Some Films on ‘Sexual Disorientation’, in turn, relates to the confirmation of a fact: gay and lesbian film did ‘not’ exist before the 1970s or if it existed, it was limited to only two or three works. Given that the idea of a group or concept of gay and lesbian identity based on the term sexual ‘orientation’ did not exist (it emerged in the 1970s), this body of films cannot easily be described using those terms. This does not mean to say that there were no sexually ambiguous films suggesting ‘strange’ desires or ‘disoriented’ artists and filmmakers. Hundreds of films featured homosexual characters, but very few were made by homosexuals and even fewer had a gay or lesbian content.

  • Gordon Matta-Clark.  Splitting, 1974
    12 march, 1997 - 30 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This film and video series presents an overview of the film work of the North American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (New York, 1943-1978), an oeuvre that was largely forgotten for a long period of time. Beginning early in the 1970s until his death in 1978, Matta-Clark was one of the main driving forces on the New York SoHo art scene, characterised by his experiments aimed at breaking the limits that define an artwork, altering the structures established in the art world and exploding numerous means of artistic expression.

  • Peter Fordham. Yoko Ono y John Lenon filmando Imagine, 1970
    5 february, 1997 - 1 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This series is dedicated to the film work of Yoko Ono (Tokyo, 1933), sixteen films made between 1966 and 1982 that fill a unique space in the history of independent film in the United States. Yoko Ono participated in a general assault on film conventions during an extraordinarily creative period in American culture, during which directors developed alternative forms of production, distribution and exhibition. Coming from the same complex set of interdisciplinary experiences that inspired performance art and objects during those years, Ono’s films are like her songs (with their characteristic abstract expressivity) and like her artworks and sculptures because they too focus on materials in such a way that they expose the very phenomenon of perception.

  • Rea Tajiri. History and Memory, 1991
    20 september, 1995 - 7 october, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Wanderers: Reflections on Exile is a video programme that ‘upsets’ the relationship maintained with Spain and the identity of individuals in society, looking at the margins to take stock of the occasional pleasures and evils that result from different types of exile: physical exile, made up of political exiles, refugees, self-declared ex-pats, immigrants and ‘perpetual travellers’ and mental exile, made up of insane, alienated, depressed, marginalised, unconscious and creative people.

  • Jordi Teixidó / Mal Pelo. Mundana, 1995
    10 may, 1995 - 3 june, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Choreographing for the Camera is a film, video and conference series on the concept of video dance that includes audiovisual pieces somewhere between dance, film and video created by directors, choreographers and dancers working together. To reconstruct the process since Merce Cunningham and Nam June Paik made their first video dance piece, it is important to remember that modern dance and film have been conjoined since the outset and have had cyclical moments of intense collaboration. The appearance of video - the tool closest to avant-garde movements - at the time of the ascendency of the creation of contemporary dance in the United States and Europe rekindled a desire to experiment among choreographers. The possibility of participating in the great communicative power of audiovisual media tempted many young choreographers who found new staging spaces and new ways of reaching in the public in images. The 1980s were a golden age for video dance productions, especially in France and Belgium, where public institutions decisively supported their creators. Festivals and shows like the Centre Pompidou’s Video Danse and competitions like Grand Prix and Dance Screen organised by the International Music + Media Center (IMZ), became meeting points for the profession and a thermometer of the quality and quantity of productions in the genre, and also revealed the growing interest of television programmers. It was during these years as well that video dance began to appear in Spain: La Mostra de Video-Dansa in Barcelona was a driving force, not only from the point of view of dissemination, but also in terms of production in the country. In Madrid, festivals like Madrid en Danza provided annual grants, while the Metrópolis (TVE) and Piezas (Canal+) programmes regularly broadcast national and international video dance programmes.

  • Luis Canicio. Ombligo, 1993
    6 april, 1995 - 29 april, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Computer-generated images and interactive virtual reality systems, both products of a graphic evolution in images and the historical development of the interaction between artist, artwork and viewer, have heralded a complete transformation in traditional art practices. Everything Flows: Spanish Computer Graphics is a collection of videos that illustrate this important transformation in Spain through a selection of some of the most outstanding works of the last ten years, from the first computer-generated piece by Juan Carlos Eguillor (San Sebastian, 1947 - Madrid, 2001) to works made in the sphere of virtual reality by Águeda Simó and telematic projects by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (Mexico City, 1967).

  • Cerith Wyn Evans. Degrees of Blindness, 1988
    1 march, 1995 - 25 march, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On This Side of the Channel: British Video Art is a retrospective made up of four programmes of video art, computer animation and other creative works produced for commercial television in the British Isles that stand out from other electronic works because of their originality and the quality. Spanning a quarter century (from the first formal experiments to recent projects using more sophisticated technology), this programme presents a revealing record of British artists who have used electronic media to make important, vibrant creations as an alternative to commercial television. The first set of works, grouped under the title A Brief History of British Video Art: 1975 - 1990, offers a historical overview of video art projects that includes works by David Hall (Leicester, 1937), Jeremy Welsh (Gateshead, 1954), Mona Hatoum (Beirut, 1952) and Keith Piper (Malta, 1960); the second, New British Video: 1990 - 1994, focuses on a short period of four years to highlight the richness of the most recent work, including pieces by Michael Curran (Scotland, 1963), Steve Hawley, Andrew Stones (Sheffield, 1960) and Terry Flaxton (London, 1953); while A Brief Introduction to British Computer Animation: 1968 - 1994 returns to a more extended timeframe to spotlight the most important examples from the world of computer graphics, almost from its very beginnings. The programme starts off with some of the first experimental projects done in the domain of computer-animated images, featuring artists like Tony Pritchett (England, 1938), Stan Hayward (England, 1930) and Darrell Viner (Coventry, 1946 - London, 2001), and ends with some truly surprising and sophisticated technological pieces, exemplified by Alan Schechner, William Latham (England, 1961) and Andrew Budd. Finally, the works grouped under the title Virtual Television focus on a highly innovative group of electronic pieces that were either especially produced for or premiered on British television, such as First Direct, directed by Marc Ortmans, A Short History of the Wheel (1993) by Tony Hill (London, 1946) and Stooky Bill (1990) by David Hall.

  • Juan Hidalgo. Una acción Zag, 1993. Foto: J. Antonio Mula
    11 october, 1994 - 4 november, 1994
    Cinema and video Conference Performance art

    The Action

  • Industrial Light & Magic. The Mask, 1994
    28 september, 1994 - 15 october, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Cyberculture is upon us. It is the last movement of the 20th century. Its supporters are the first cyberspace nomads: a heterogeneous group of visionary scientists, hackers, computer-fan musicians and digital image artists. Their interests range from high technology to virtual games, from hypertext to smart drinks, from cyberpunk literature to the Internet and brain implants. Their motto: Information must be free! Art Futura ’94: Cyberculture is a video and conference programme designed to draw attention to this new and fascinating universe.

  • Paul McCarthy y Mike Kelley. Heidi, 1992
    1 june, 1994 - 18 june, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    New Trends from the World Wide Video Festival 1993-1994 is a single-channel video programme that brings together a selection of works representative of the dominant trends at the 12th World Wide Video Festival, a very broad - though always random - review of the immense diversity found today in multimedia art. Within the variety inherent in the programme, it is possible to identify some larger trends. Many of the works reveal a desire for political commitment, a motif that has become stronger in recent years as many of the artists have become obsessed with the changes in the world, especially in the Eastern Bloc and China. There is also a tendency to mix an artist’s images with earlier ones, as well as an important increase in elements from performance pieces and videos based on performance art. An upsurge in documentary-type productions made by and about artists from a very personal point of view is also notable. Finally, many of the works in this selection share an autobiographical intent.

  • Nam June Paik. A Tribute to John Cage, 1973-1976
    2 february, 1994 - 26 february, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    1993 marks 30 years since the spring-summer of 1963 when Nam June Paik (Seoul, 1932 - Miami, 2006) inaugurated his Exposition of Music-Electronic Television at the Galerie Parnass in Wuppertal. Having acquired a mythical aura over the years, the event is considered to represent the birth of the electronic arts today. This video programme reflects recent investigations in the field, which have made it possible to recover and publically present some of Paik’s ealiest work - particularly his experimental films, early videos and the first intermedia audiovisual explorations - now rescued from the oblivion in which they lay for 30 years.

  • Montxo Algora, Brad Degraf, Michael Wahrman. PAU, 1990
    20 october, 1993 - 4 november, 1993
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Art is like blood: it has to flow continually to stay alive. When the media through which it is expressed do not expand, its only alternative is to find new channels that almost magically lift it to a higher level. Art Futura ’93/Retrospective ’90-92 is a video and conference programme that presents some of the most important pieces and contributions to the field from works seen over the four years of Art Futura, an annual art and technology programme that came to life in Barcelona in the 1990s. It four sessions, dedicated respectively to Virtual Reality (1990), the Cybermedia (1991), the Global Mind (1992) and to Artificial Life (1993) have been guided by the idea of “scratching the future”, of building a space for artists’ ideas and expressions that, by their very nature, do not fit into the categories established by art institutions, as especially occurs in the case of those that make use of the new technologies.