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  • Harun Farocki. Auge / Maschine I, 2001
    24 october, 2002 - 15 november, 2002
    Cinema and video Film series Conference
  • Enlace-14
    27 may, 2002
    Cinema and video Film series
  • Stephen y Timothy Quay. In Absentia, 2000
    13 november, 2001 - 19 december, 2001
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Film and Almost Film 2001 presents a selection of 22 works by experimental film directors and artists who, influenced by film and television, have taken a new approach to their work in an attempt to create a new genre of ‘art film’. This genre has traditionally been linked, both in terms of technique and narrative, to European experimental film, which, produced with low or medium budgets, has tried to reorient film practices and aesthetics. Nonetheless, in the last few years, the connotations inherent in the idea of ‘art film’ have grown.

  • Pere Portabella. Vampir-Cuadecuc, 1971
    3 may, 2001 - 25 may, 2001
    Cinema and video Film series

    Historias sin argumento is a programme that presents the different stages in the filmography of Pere Portabella (Figueres, 1929) as a filmmaker and producer from the 1950s to today. His production company 59 Films was the driving force behind some of the cornerstone productions of Spain’s post-civil war critical realism (Los golfos, Carlos Saura; El cochecito, Marco Ferreri; Viridiana, Luis Buñel). At the end of the 1960s he was involved with the formation of the Barcelona School. His early films as a director, written in collaboration with the poet Joan Brossa (Barcelona, 1919-1998) (No compteu amb els dits and Nocturn 29), combine the cultural inheritance of the avant-garde with the languages that were coming onto the scene and shaking up the 1960s, and became known as ‘new cinema’. He was one of the key figures in the development of independent, alternative and clandestine cinema whose work was inextricably linked to his political opposition to Franco’s regime. Films like Vampir-Cuadecuc (1970), Umbracle (1971-1972) and his series of short films about Joan Miró (1969-1973), along with his participation in the Grup de Treball, were radical interventions in the cinema and art worlds.

  • Helena Soldberg. Carmen Miranda: Bananas Is My Business, 1995
    1 february, 2001 - 11 march, 2001
    Cinema and video Film series

    With B&W and Colour. Latin America: cinema, video and multimedia, the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía presents an up-to-date panorama of Latin American audiovisual art along with an exhibition entitled Agitation as Daily Ritual - Cartographies of Desire that brings 30 films and videos made by female artists between 1965 and 1987 to Spain for the first time. B&W and Colour crosses conventional boundaries, not only because of its unusual nature, variety and the contents of the selected works, but because of its pluralist inclination. Most of these pieces deal with the fragmentation of society into different ethnic, social and cultural groups and show us how to decode a culture that seems closer than it really is.

  • 19 october, 2000
    Cinema and video Film series

    Cameras, screens, computers, recorders, photocopiers, printers, scanners, holograms, magnetic material and CDs are a regular part of the contemporary scene as both instruments and ubiquitous, versatile media. The electronic and media arts are not the result of the seduction of novelty, but rather a consequence of responsible proximity to what is happening in the world. The arts have adopted instruments from the information and communication industries and factories and given them other functions and configurations that make abundant use of inter-, multi- and transmedia amalgams.

  • John Whitney. Lapis, 1963-1966
    3 june, 1999 - 26 june, 1999
    Cinema and video Film series

    Calculated Cinema is a film and video series that focuses its attention on the pioneering use of computers and electronics in experimental films as expressed in works by filmmakers like Oskar Fischinger (Gelnhausen, 1900 - Los Angeles, 1967), Mary Ellen Bute (Houston, 1906 - New York, 1983), John (Pasadena, 1917 - Los Angeles, 1995) and James Whitney (Pasadena, 1921 - Los Angeles, 1982), Jordan Belson (Chicago, 1926 - San Francisco, 2011), Peter Kubelka (Vienna, 1934), Werner Nekes (Erfurt, 1944), Larry Cuba (Atlanta, 1950) and Robert Darroll (England, 1946).

  • Robert Cahen. Voyage d'hiver, 1993
    11 february, 1999 - 6 march, 1999
    Cinema and video Film series

    This programme presents a broad and representative cross-section of the work of Robert Cahen (Valence, 1945), a filmmaker, photographer and composer who has made more than fifty films and videos since 1973, when he first became interested in the audiovisual arts after meeting Pierre Schaeffer (Nancy, 1910 - Aix, 1995), with whom he studied Musique concrète at the Conservatoire de Paris. Cahen finds inspiration in images and memories, in the sensations of travelling, the world of theatre, dance and art, and in the visual and sound experiments that he has been conducting with electronic images and Musique concrète for more than thirty years. In every case, his extraordinary knowledge of the music world shapes the work, its conception and its rhythm.

  • Antoni Muntadas y Toni Serra. The Limousine Project, 1991
    20 september, 1998 - 21 october, 1998
    Cinema and video Film series

    Twenty-five years separate the first video work by Antoni Muntadas (Barcelona, 1942), Acciones (a study of the so-called sub-senses carried out from a series of experiments done between 1971 and 1973), and his latest episode of Political Advertisements (1984-1996), the fourth piece dedicated to analysing election campaigns in the United States, where he has lived since the 1970s. This selection presents these twenty-five years of video work by Muntadas, a pioneer in new audiovisual and electronic media and one of the most important directors, both nationally and internationally. The programme includes all of his video work, 21 single-channel pieces organised into nine programmes arranged chronologically, allowing the viewer to follow the evolution of his interest in the context of the media, which has influenced all of his work.

  • John J. Healey. Retrato de Familia, 1998
    2 september, 1998 - 26 september, 1998
    Cinema and video Film series

    The film cycle, About Federico García Lorca features the latest audiovisual pieces dedicated to the writer in Spain, as well as the few film images that have been preserved of him, interviews with family members and friends and witnesses to the intense and passionate life and work of this universal poet.

  • La Féerie des Ballets fantastiques de Löie Fuller, de George R. Busby, 1934
    6 may, 1998 - 30 may, 1998
    Cinema and video Film series

    Video dance is usually linked to the origins of video and its relationship to contemporary dance, following the evolution of creators, artistic languages and the use of technology in the search for common ground where the two forms of expression complement each other in the communication of ideas and creation of emotions. However, the relationship between dance and image is not exclusive to the last quarter century; in fact, since its earliest days, a special attraction has existed between film and dance that today, after nearly one hundred years, still merits analysing.

  • Geoffrey O'Connor. El límite de la conquista. El viaje del jefe Wai-Wai, 1992
    1 april, 1998 - 25 april, 1998
    Cinema and video Film series

    How should Latin America be represented? Where is it? Can it be reduced to some geographical limits? Or can its space be reproduced in other spheres, like the U.S., where Latinisation is a trend that will reach its apogee in the 21st century? The Idea of a Place is a video programme that focuses on Latin America as a space/location, an ‘absolute place’ that is the sphere of authentic nomadism, directly confronting contemporary concepts of space and location, as well as the possibility of the production/reproduction of images using technology to represent both fact and fiction. Anna Bella Geiger (Rio de Janeiro, 1933) in Mapas elementales nº 3 (1976), Louis Hock (Los Angeles, 1948) with the work The Mexican Tapes: A Chronicle of Life Outside the Law, (1986) and José Gabriel Fernández (Caracas, 1957) in Hotel Arizona are some of the artists featured.

  • Justin Bennet. Sistema de Resonancias, 1991
    4 march, 1998 - 21 march, 1998
    Cinema and video Film series

    Holland is a country that has historically been open to the outside world, not only because of the different cultures that have come together within its borders, but also because of the travelling spirit of its inhabitants. Consistent with this idiosyncrasy, video art in the Netherlands has developed within an international context since the beginning. Video Art in Holland: Two Views is a series that features a selection of the most important videos from the 1997 World Wide Video Festival, the most cosmopolitan video festival in Europe, held at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam between 12 and 17 September 1997.

  • Abderrahmane Sissako. Rostov – Luanda, 1997
    31 january, 1998 - 28 february, 1998
    Cinema and video Film series

    Films from documenta X is a film and video programme that features a unique event in the history of the festival held in Kassel every five years: the creation of its own audiovisual programme, consisting of a group of fiction films and documentaries conceived and created at the behest of the documenta festival. This date on the art calendar has a long history, going back to 1955 when Arnold Bode, the exhibition founder, used the so-called Bode Plan to express his desire to present “foreign and national films in Kassel”. Accordingly, the first documenta featured 40 Years of Film Documents, while the series Happenings and Fluxus accompanied documenta 5. In addition to a selection of videos and an experimental film series, documenta 6 featured Cinema of the 1970s, and Parsifal (1982) by Hans Jürgen Syberberg (Nossendorf, 1935) was screened at the opening session of documenta 7. Finally, the film sequence Jazz-Boxing-Baseball formed part of documenta 9.

  • Jakoov A. Protazanov. Aelita, 1924
    20 december, 1997 - 28 december, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series

    The Film Machine. Mechanical Metaphors in Avant-Garde Film is a series of avant-garde films from the 1920s and 1930s relating to the impact of machines on the modern world and society, from the first European abstract and futurist experiments to Soviet propaganda films and American comedies, passing through pioneering science fiction films. The aim of this combination of narrative and experimental genres is to illustrate how the world of the machine inspired both the industry and avant-garde artists. The fascination first appeared in pioneering films by the Lumière brothers, Georges Méliès (Paris, 1861-1938), Segundo de Chomón (Teruel 1871- Paris 1929) and other anonymous artists, whose work introduces this series.

  • Mike Kelley y Paul McCarthy. Fresh Acconci, 1995
    29 october, 1997 - 22 november, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series

    The old concept of a person used to refer to oneself and to others is losing its meaning. Discourses as varied (and antagonistic) as science, religion, politics, philosophy and art indicate this movement clearly. This video programme features an orographic exploration and partial signposting of the terrain of video action, a perfect microcosm of what appears to be taking place on a different scale. Far from offering responses or interpretations, it aspires to contribute to the ruling confusion, adding new symptoms that speak equally of the generalised deterioration of these inescapably decomposing bodies.

  • Richard Serra y Nancy Holt. Boomerang, 1974
    1 october, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series

    The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía presents an anthological series divided into eight programmes on the first ten years of video as a means for artistic expression in the United States, an exhaustive look at its use in phenomenological and conceptual explorations. The First Decade in Perspective. Video Art and Alternative Media in the United States reflects attempts to establish a criticism of the North American television culture, to introduce new voices in the art world, and to capture experiments in the field of performance art, creating a new visual language.

  • Lodela, 1996. Coreografía: José Navas. Dirección: Philip Baylanc
    7 may, 1997 - 7 june, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On the occasion of the International Dance Festival in Madrid, In Two Dimensions: Dance on the Screen is a series that features an international selection of film-video-dance dedicated to the auteur. The pieces included in the seven programmes in the series were made by renowned artists who present different ways to contemplate audiovisual creation, finding their partenaire in the choreographic arts. Choreographers and directors analyse, structure, observe and direct the viewer’s gaze through the body and the movement of performers who order/disorder ideas and feelings. Moreover, each is done in a personal way, paving often extremely divergent paths, where the relationship between the two resources materialises for very different reasons.

  • Jean Cocteau. La Sang d'un Poéte, 1930
    9 april, 1997 - 3 may, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The series Of Blood, of Pleasure and of Death… presents a selection of experimental films with gay and lesbian themes designed to show some of the key pieces of avant-garde and underground film, putting them into context and in relation to the mass culture that generated them. The series title, in part inspired by the film trilogy by Gregory Markopoulos (Toledo, 1928 - Freiburg, 1992) Du sang, de la volupté et de la mort (1947-1948) acts as a metaphor for a series of films that, like the work by Markopoulos, see ‘blood, pleasure and death’ as an imaginary place where the desire, pain and the annihilation of the body are confronted and its being is oppressed by social norms and sexual taboos. The second part of the title, Some Films on ‘Sexual Disorientation’, in turn, relates to the confirmation of a fact: gay and lesbian film did ‘not’ exist before the 1970s or if it existed, it was limited to only two or three works. Given that the idea of a group or concept of gay and lesbian identity based on the term sexual ‘orientation’ did not exist (it emerged in the 1970s), this body of films cannot easily be described using those terms. This does not mean to say that there were no sexually ambiguous films suggesting ‘strange’ desires or ‘disoriented’ artists and filmmakers. Hundreds of films featured homosexual characters, but very few were made by homosexuals and even fewer had a gay or lesbian content.

  • Gordon Matta-Clark.  Splitting, 1974
    12 march, 1997 - 30 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This film and video series presents an overview of the film work of the North American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (New York, 1943-1978), an oeuvre that was largely forgotten for a long period of time. Beginning early in the 1970s until his death in 1978, Matta-Clark was one of the main driving forces on the New York SoHo art scene, characterised by his experiments aimed at breaking the limits that define an artwork, altering the structures established in the art world and exploding numerous means of artistic expression.

  • Peter Fordham. Yoko Ono y John Lenon filmando Imagine, 1970
    5 february, 1997 - 1 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This series is dedicated to the film work of Yoko Ono (Tokyo, 1933), sixteen films made between 1966 and 1982 that fill a unique space in the history of independent film in the United States. Yoko Ono participated in a general assault on film conventions during an extraordinarily creative period in American culture, during which directors developed alternative forms of production, distribution and exhibition. Coming from the same complex set of interdisciplinary experiences that inspired performance art and objects during those years, Ono’s films are like her songs (with their characteristic abstract expressivity) and like her artworks and sculptures because they too focus on materials in such a way that they expose the very phenomenon of perception.

  • Gordon Matta-Clark.  Splitting, 1974
    11 december, 1996 - 21 december, 1996
    Cinema and video Film series

    Elementary Triptych of Spain is the last film project by José Val del Omar. The idea arose in the last stages of his life and was aimed at creating a trilogy using his three ‘elemental pieces’: Aguaespejo granadino [Water-Mirror of Granada] (1955), Fuego en Castilla [Fire in Castille] (1960) and Acariño galaico [Galician Caress] (1961).

  • Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker. Achterland, 1994
    8 may, 1996 - 1 june, 1996
    Cinema and video Film series

    For the second year in a row, the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía is dedicating an audiovisual programme to video dance, a genre that is validated by some of the most representative works in the field. Choreographic art, expressed through moving images, continues to generate unique works which are beautiful and intense, and in which audiovisual creation displays its wealth of formats, techniques and styles. Dance on camera occupies and attains unique spaces, reorganising ‘real’ time and championing their communicative capacity.

  • Diamanda Galas. Double Barrel Prayer, 1992
    10 april, 1996 - 26 april, 1996
    Cinema and video Film series

    Once upon a Time…from Minimal Art to Cabaret: 1970s - 90s is a series dedicated to performance art made by women designed to introduce the works and approaches that have served as reference points for many of the latest creations in the visual arts. The pieces in this programme, which spans almost three decades, show the richness and dynamism of this means of expression and help to explain the development of performance art and its versatility.

  • Nigel Rolfe. La cuerda que nos une nos hace libres, 1983
    6 march, 1996 - 30 march, 1996
    Cinema and video Film series

    Lights, Action, Sound and Movement…for the Camera is an anthology that describes the relationship between video and performance art over the last 25 years. Although it brings together some of the most representative pieces created by important figures in this field, the programme as a whole does not presume to present a definitive history of video performance. Rather, it is designed to show the evolution of this hybrid form, which is increasingly complex and developed, in four different programmes.

  • RASKIN. No tienes corazón, 1991
    31 january, 1996 - 24 february, 1996
    Cinema and video Film series

    The series Retrospective: German Video Art presents a retrospective of German video art from the 1980s to the present day. Axel Wirths, the curator, has organised the programme (a total of 34 pieces) into five blocks of works grouped according to their thematic dichotomies: Body and Soul, Politics and Daily Life, Nature and Technology, Music and Language and Irony and Fate.

  • Peter Callas. Night's High Noon, 1988
    29 november, 1995 - 16 december, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series

    The intensity with which Australians possess and use consumer electronics is famous. Indeed, by using videos and computers, Australian artists have managed to avoid what has been called ‘the tyranny of distance’. For artists like John McCormack (Melbourne, 1964), the computer has become a way to escape the limitations of the physical world. An Eccentric Orbit: Video Art in Australia presents a selective look at a varied and abundant field: contemporary electronic artworks produced in Australia between 1980 and 1995. The programme is divided into three thematic sections. The programme entitled The Body Electric contains works that contemplate falling into a physical and psychological trap, proposing a release through dreams, technology and the imagination. The second block, entitled Any Resemblance to Reality is Purely Deliberate, deals with the magic of construction and deconstruction in or by the computer culture, while the works included in the section Reduced Paradise reflect on place and the lack of location. The themes in each programme represent what could be considered the three concerns of contemporary Australian culture condensed into the work of video artists and directors. Obviously each of these themes refers to the gestalt of a culture immersed in the post-industrialist dualisms found in all western civilisation: the active construction of the ‘perceived’ polarities between nature and culture, nature and technology and human beings and technology. However, without openly resorting to an ‘Australian’ iconography, most of the artists in these three programmes present a curiously idiosyncratic approach to electronic culture, resulting in a reflection on video and computer storage devices, the most easily transportable media available to artists. These same media are also extremely useful for citizens living in a country that can only be reached by an almost daylong flight from Europe and even longer from the East Coast of the United States.

  • Luis Buñuel. Un Perro Andaluz, 1929
    18 november, 1995 - 17 december, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series

    In 1990, the Cinemadart festival in Barcelona brought together a dozen prestigious Spanish specialists to reflect on different questions related to the conjunction of surrealists, surrealism and film. The Surrealist Gaze is a film and video series that compiles the criteria of the retrospective put together by Julio Pérez Perucha to illustrate those debates.

  • Javier Codesal. Sábado Legionario, 1988
    11 october, 1995 - 4 november, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series

    Video Signals: Aspects of Spanish Video Creation in Recent Years is an audiovisual series that features 40 works by more than 35 artists made between 1988 and 1995, designed to offer a view/review of recent Spanish video. The exhibition was not conceived as a ‘who’s who’ of video in Spain - i.e., the artists with the longest careers and biggest reputations - but rather as a type of critical anthology, to borrow from the world of literature. The selection is neither indiscriminate nor whimsical, the range neither wide nor narrow, but spacious enough to include some new contributions and ones that might have passed unnoticed on other circuits. However, no attempt has been made to cover specific genres or subgenres - such as the standard music video clip, video dance, art documentary and the occasional television productions with an experimental touch - even though the selection does include some pieces linked or contiguous with them. In any case, the selection is admittedly partial in every sense of the word.

  • Rea Tajiri. History and Memory, 1991
    20 september, 1995 - 7 october, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Wanderers: Reflections on Exile is a video programme that ‘upsets’ the relationship maintained with Spain and the identity of individuals in society, looking at the margins to take stock of the occasional pleasures and evils that result from different types of exile: physical exile, made up of political exiles, refugees, self-declared ex-pats, immigrants and ‘perpetual travellers’ and mental exile, made up of insane, alienated, depressed, marginalised, unconscious and creative people.

  • Ines Cardoso. Diástole, 1994
    14 june, 1995 - 1 july, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series

    This series features a selection of pieces from the World Wide Video Festival ’95 that highlight the diversity and limits of video art today. Video has never been a ‘pure’ medium, since it can be combined with and complemented by film, photography, performance art and, increasingly, computer techniques. The range of aesthetic and formal focus points, from an almost pictorial poetic narrative to abstract explorations of electronic chaos, is very wide. Free from the restrictions imposed by television and film advertising, video artists enjoy complete freedom to choose their own formats. Beyond the documentary genre, many concentrate substance and content into short but powerful audiovisual declarations.

  • Eugenia Balcells y Eugeni Bonet. 133, 1978-1979
    7 june, 1995 - 22 june, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series

    With a view to providing a multi-disciplinary overview of Eugènia Balcells’ (Barcelona, 1942) career as an artist and as a complement to the exhibition being shown on the third floor of the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, her experimental films from the 1970s are being screened. In addition, two sessions of the performance piece Imágenes para sonidos will be staged with the collaboration of musicians Peter van Riper and Llorenç Barber.

  • Jordi Teixidó / Mal Pelo. Mundana, 1995
    10 may, 1995 - 3 june, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Choreographing for the Camera is a film, video and conference series on the concept of video dance that includes audiovisual pieces somewhere between dance, film and video created by directors, choreographers and dancers working together. To reconstruct the process since Merce Cunningham and Nam June Paik made their first video dance piece, it is important to remember that modern dance and film have been conjoined since the outset and have had cyclical moments of intense collaboration. The appearance of video - the tool closest to avant-garde movements - at the time of the ascendency of the creation of contemporary dance in the United States and Europe rekindled a desire to experiment among choreographers. The possibility of participating in the great communicative power of audiovisual media tempted many young choreographers who found new staging spaces and new ways of reaching in the public in images. The 1980s were a golden age for video dance productions, especially in France and Belgium, where public institutions decisively supported their creators. Festivals and shows like the Centre Pompidou’s Video Danse and competitions like Grand Prix and Dance Screen organised by the International Music + Media Center (IMZ), became meeting points for the profession and a thermometer of the quality and quantity of productions in the genre, and also revealed the growing interest of television programmers. It was during these years as well that video dance began to appear in Spain: La Mostra de Video-Dansa in Barcelona was a driving force, not only from the point of view of dissemination, but also in terms of production in the country. In Madrid, festivals like Madrid en Danza provided annual grants, while the Metrópolis (TVE) and Piezas (Canal+) programmes regularly broadcast national and international video dance programmes.

  • Luis Canicio. Ombligo, 1993
    6 april, 1995 - 29 april, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Computer-generated images and interactive virtual reality systems, both products of a graphic evolution in images and the historical development of the interaction between artist, artwork and viewer, have heralded a complete transformation in traditional art practices. Everything Flows: Spanish Computer Graphics is a collection of videos that illustrate this important transformation in Spain through a selection of some of the most outstanding works of the last ten years, from the first computer-generated piece by Juan Carlos Eguillor (San Sebastian, 1947 - Madrid, 2001) to works made in the sphere of virtual reality by Águeda Simó and telematic projects by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (Mexico City, 1967).

  • Cerith Wyn Evans. Degrees of Blindness, 1988
    1 march, 1995 - 25 march, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On This Side of the Channel: British Video Art is a retrospective made up of four programmes of video art, computer animation and other creative works produced for commercial television in the British Isles that stand out from other electronic works because of their originality and the quality. Spanning a quarter century (from the first formal experiments to recent projects using more sophisticated technology), this programme presents a revealing record of British artists who have used electronic media to make important, vibrant creations as an alternative to commercial television. The first set of works, grouped under the title A Brief History of British Video Art: 1975 - 1990, offers a historical overview of video art projects that includes works by David Hall (Leicester, 1937), Jeremy Welsh (Gateshead, 1954), Mona Hatoum (Beirut, 1952) and Keith Piper (Malta, 1960); the second, New British Video: 1990 - 1994, focuses on a short period of four years to highlight the richness of the most recent work, including pieces by Michael Curran (Scotland, 1963), Steve Hawley, Andrew Stones (Sheffield, 1960) and Terry Flaxton (London, 1953); while A Brief Introduction to British Computer Animation: 1968 - 1994 returns to a more extended timeframe to spotlight the most important examples from the world of computer graphics, almost from its very beginnings. The programme starts off with some of the first experimental projects done in the domain of computer-animated images, featuring artists like Tony Pritchett (England, 1938), Stan Hayward (England, 1930) and Darrell Viner (Coventry, 1946 - London, 2001), and ends with some truly surprising and sophisticated technological pieces, exemplified by Alan Schechner, William Latham (England, 1961) and Andrew Budd. Finally, the works grouped under the title Virtual Television focus on a highly innovative group of electronic pieces that were either especially produced for or premiered on British television, such as First Direct, directed by Marc Ortmans, A Short History of the Wheel (1993) by Tony Hill (London, 1946) and Stooky Bill (1990) by David Hall.

  • Ilene Segalove. Porque veo televisión y otras historias, 1983
    2 february, 1995 - 25 february, 1995
    Cinema and video Film series

    Video art, an art trend that uses video as its medium, has served as a form of expression for a large number of Spanish artists. It is relatively young: it was born at the end of the 1960s and, since the first works appeared, its evolution has been paired with technological advances in the medium. Video Art: The First 25 Years commemorates the first quarter century of this means of artistic expression with an anthological exhibition curated by Barbara London that includes 48 works in chronological order from the early years of video until the 1990s. The programme features North American artists such as Nam June Paik (Seoul 1932 - Miami, 2006), Bill Viola (New York, 1951), Gary Hill (Santa Monica, 1951), Laurie Anderson (Glen Ellyn, 1957), Peter Callas (Sidney, 1952) and Woody Vasulka (Brno, 1937). Taken as a whole, these works provide an exemplary review of the historical evolution of video and a great opportunity to become acquainted with its main trends.

  • Industrial Light & Magic. The Mask, 1994
    28 september, 1994 - 15 october, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Cyberculture is upon us. It is the last movement of the 20th century. Its supporters are the first cyberspace nomads: a heterogeneous group of visionary scientists, hackers, computer-fan musicians and digital image artists. Their interests range from high technology to virtual games, from hypertext to smart drinks, from cyberpunk literature to the Internet and brain implants. Their motto: Information must be free! Art Futura ’94: Cyberculture is a video and conference programme designed to draw attention to this new and fascinating universe.

  • Paul McCarthy y Mike Kelley. Heidi, 1992
    1 june, 1994 - 18 june, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    New Trends from the World Wide Video Festival 1993-1994 is a single-channel video programme that brings together a selection of works representative of the dominant trends at the 12th World Wide Video Festival, a very broad - though always random - review of the immense diversity found today in multimedia art. Within the variety inherent in the programme, it is possible to identify some larger trends. Many of the works reveal a desire for political commitment, a motif that has become stronger in recent years as many of the artists have become obsessed with the changes in the world, especially in the Eastern Bloc and China. There is also a tendency to mix an artist’s images with earlier ones, as well as an important increase in elements from performance pieces and videos based on performance art. An upsurge in documentary-type productions made by and about artists from a very personal point of view is also notable. Finally, many of the works in this selection share an autobiographical intent.

  • Jean-Pierre Gorin. Mi loca vida, 1992
    27 april, 1994 - 21 may, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series

    A Sampling of Film and Video from the 1993 Whitney Biennial is a film and video programme that brings together some of the pieces featured at the Biennial held by the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1993. The museum, a key institution in the art world, has traditionally been the place where art has been evaluated. However, until recently, the exhibitions there tended to give priority to their analysis of the historiographical aspects of production without sufficiently considering the complexity that characterises the use of the media in contemporary culture. The media arts today respond to the public setting in which we live and they draw on it, creating a fluid discourse that makes a more varied relationship possible between the artist and the artwork, as well as between artists and society, efficiently subverting the dominion of a uniform national identity.

  • Joseph Beuys in Kunstalle of Berna, 1969
    6 april, 1994 - 23 april, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series

    The concept of extended art as designed and practiced by Joseph Beuys (Krefeld, 1921 - Düsseldorf, 1986) requires communication routes that go beyond traditional exhibition forms, in addition to photography and text. Actions are a central medium in his work, as are his appearances in public during conferences and debates and the long-term processes that he initiated with projects like 7,000 Oaks. The structural elements in these works can be captured by film and video. By recording the images and sounds of these events and actions, which date back many years in Beuys’ oeuvre, they can be more intensely reproduced, while the visual documents offer reliable material for analysis at the same time. This series of screenings presents an approach to the themes in Joseph Beuys’ work with the assistance of extracts and examples from the artist’s audiovisual legacy that include hundreds of scenes in order to illustrate his human side and illuminate the incredibly complex structure of his artistic work from another angle. The videos and films that recorded his actions, like Eurasia Siberian Symphony, Celtic and Filz TV, contain numerous references to earlier situations and contexts for using the materials and objects that form part of installations today as reminiscences of his actions or are found in collections as isolated pieces. In this way, it is possible to experience the genesis of specific works and the nature of the process of the overall work. The visual documents complete the installations and the exhibited objects.

  • Walter Verdin, Octavio Iturbe, Win Vandekeybus. La Mentira, 1992
    9 march, 1994 - 19 march, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series

    Paris (Europe) Here: New Video Trends in France is a video programme that responds to current questions about the place occupied by videos produced in France today in the field of the visual arts, undeniably confirming its role as a specific place where the different creative currents found in this field for decades cross and interweave. It is a place, a function, a space and a time where artists do not have to defend themselves against film or the visual arts to implant their own compositions in every corner. Subjecting themselves to otherness, carrying the other with them like an agent of the ego, these works calmly pass by earlier fights, the battles won and lost in the fields of creation and dissemination.

  • Nam June Paik. A Tribute to John Cage, 1973-1976
    2 february, 1994 - 26 february, 1994
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    1993 marks 30 years since the spring-summer of 1963 when Nam June Paik (Seoul, 1932 - Miami, 2006) inaugurated his Exposition of Music-Electronic Television at the Galerie Parnass in Wuppertal. Having acquired a mythical aura over the years, the event is considered to represent the birth of the electronic arts today. This video programme reflects recent investigations in the field, which have made it possible to recover and publically present some of Paik’s ealiest work - particularly his experimental films, early videos and the first intermedia audiovisual explorations - now rescued from the oblivion in which they lay for 30 years.

  • Montxo Algora, Brad Degraf, Michael Wahrman. PAU, 1990
    20 october, 1993 - 4 november, 1993
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Art is like blood: it has to flow continually to stay alive. When the media through which it is expressed do not expand, its only alternative is to find new channels that almost magically lift it to a higher level. Art Futura ’93/Retrospective ’90-92 is a video and conference programme that presents some of the most important pieces and contributions to the field from works seen over the four years of Art Futura, an annual art and technology programme that came to life in Barcelona in the 1990s. It four sessions, dedicated respectively to Virtual Reality (1990), the Cybermedia (1991), the Global Mind (1992) and to Artificial Life (1993) have been guided by the idea of “scratching the future”, of building a space for artists’ ideas and expressions that, by their very nature, do not fit into the categories established by art institutions, as especially occurs in the case of those that make use of the new technologies.

  • Ilppo Pohjola. P(l)ain Truth, 1993
    19 may, 1993 - 20 may, 1993
    Cinema and video Film series

    Time Code IV is a video programme that features the pieces included in the fourth Time Code, an international project founded in 1986 by a group of broadcast directors and programming heads from the most important television stations, along with independent producers from several countries. It uses television as a medium for visual communication and cultural exchange, respecting the identity of each participant and also guaranteeing that countries with fewer possibilities can take part with their own productions. The project is structured such that each of the participants produces a short piece by a video artist from their country and in exchange receives an international programme with all of the pieces produced by the other countries for the event. In each case, the main challenge is to create an international network of broadcast directors, programming heads and cultural programme producers to establish communication and cooperation in the field of images. Time Code I presented seven productions by internationally renowned video artists like Robert Cahen (Valence, 1945), Gusztav Hamos (Budapest, 1955), Brenda Miller (New York, 1941) and Xavier Villaverde (La Coruña, 1958). Time Code II featured twelve video clips under the generic title of Transfer Musical and included the Spanish piece Ruedo 360, 5600º K by Gustavo Martínez, which was acquired by the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía for its presentation at the Moving Image Biennial. Time Code III, entitled Rituals of Love, presented seven videos related to the theme of love and included the participation of the Museo Reina Sofía.

  • Visit to Picasso of Paul Haesaerts
    13 may, 1993 - 5 june, 1993
    Cinema and video Film series

    At the point where films on art are at their most inventive and creative, Pablo Picasso (Malaga, 1881 - Mougins, 1973) has long been a target, the object of inquiry and seduction. Trapped by a silent and almost forgotten attraction, the cinema has focused on his oeuvre, a motionless immensity in time. After the Second World War, when films on art appeared in France, Belgium and Italy, three essential pioneers in the genre made - within years of each other - three key films in the history of films on art, all about Picasso’s work: Guernica (1949) by Robert Hessens and Alain Resnais (Vannes, 1922), Visite à Picasso (1950) by Paul Haesaerts (Boom, 1901 - Brussels, 1974) and Picasso (1953) by Luciano Emmer (Milan, 1918 - Rome, 2009). It is almost impossible to imagine all the films that have been made about the artist since then and difficult to realise that, going back a bit further in time, other films could emerge from where they lie hidden to take their place on the long list of works dedicated to the painter from Malaga. The result would be 140 hours of screen time, i.e., an uninterrupted programme of five and a half days. In these otherworldly sessions, the painter and his work would appear on the screen, in forms ranging from drawings to ink, engravings to sculpture, from collage to oils, ceramics and pottery. Nothing would interrupt the artist’s work except for the changing of the reels in the projector, brief intervals in this permanent cinema session. The fascinated viewer would then take a kind of condensed, stunning tour through the work of a lifetime.