List of selected artworks. Maps for the tour in the museum

Preview

Search

Cinema and Video

The audiovisual programs are intended to counteract the predominant model of the black cube, even at a time in which both film and video have become fully integrated and dissolved into contemporary art museums. Their aim is to explore the projected image using different formats and discourses: historical series that broaden – and question – the narrations told by the Collection, retrospectives that draw attention to other stories in the audiovisual history and programs that examine the close links that film and video have with contemporary artistic practices. At the same time, this programming seeks to define a space for film and video outside of the usual circuits, describing itineraries distinct from the spectacle and its derivatives.    

Results

  • David Lamelas. The Light at the Edge of a Nightmare, 2002-2004
    14 january, 2005 - 22 january, 2005
    Cinema and video Film series

    The work of David Lamelas (Buenos Aires, 1946) is unique in that it unites formal objectivism with the embodiment of the artist’s subjective experience and is marked by his time in different cities like Los Angeles, London, Paris and Berlin. This series, structured into three programmes, offers a tour through these cities as they appear in his work at different significant moments of his life between his break with Buenos Aires and his return there.

  • Bill Morrison.The Mesmerist, 2003
    4 november, 2004 - 12 december, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Encounter

    This year, Film and Almost Film presents 33 pieces, most of which were created between 2002 and 2004 by visual artists and Spanish and international filmmakers.

  • Kai Sibley. Retrato de Stan Brakhage en un café de Boulder, Colorado, 2001
    14 october, 2004 - 31 october, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Stan Brakhage: in Search of the Sublime

  • Elena del Rivero. Dust, 2002
    11 september, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series

    This series is dedicated to the audiovisual work done by artists who lived near the events of 9/11 and who documented the before and after of the attack on the World Trade Center in New York on Tuesday 11 September 2001, which the world witnessed on their television screens. Since then, the unrepeatable moment that the airplanes crashed into the World Trade Center has been rebroadcast endlessly, becoming fixed in the collective memory, condensing the innumerable effects of Al Qaeda’s attack against the United States.

  • Eric Pauwels. Lettre à Jean Rouch , 2000
    10 september, 2004 - 30 september, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series

    A Zone of Crossovers is a series dedicated to the Belgian film and video scene, a heterogeneous place where extremely different approaches, forms and strategies come together. Without a doubt, this circumstance reflects and is a symptom of the complex historical, political and cultural reality of this small country which, since its founding in 1830, has embodied a commitment to neutralise territorial conflicts between adjacent powers: Germany, England, France and Holland. The setting for historical clashes between the Latin and Germanic worlds, Belgium is also a space characterised by a rich cultural hybridisation in which the appearance of figures like René Magritte, Marcel Broodthaers and Panamarenko cannot be considered a coincidence.

  • Chris Cunningham. All is Full of Love, 1999
    14 june, 2004 - 23 june, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series

    Describing Love (in 7 Fragments) presents some twenty videos and seven films that, using different moments and contexts, reflect on love and are related to seven ideas taken from the book by Roland Barthes (Cherbourg, 1915 - Paris, 1980), Fragments d’un discourse amoureux. The book is structured around topics (arranged from A to Z) that the author defines both theoretically and personally. As in the book, the programme follows Barthes’ ideas in alphabetical order, as he presents them in the original French, thus questioning the linearity of the narrative of the subject’s experience and his love affair, providing a portrait (which is structural more than biographical) in which the loving subject speaks about himself in a confrontation with the loved object, who does not speak.

  • Ulrike Ottinger. Freak Orlando, 1981
    12 may, 2004 - 3 june, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Encounter

    This series is dedicated to the work of artist, photographer and director Ulrike Ottinger (Konstanz, 1942), one of the most emblematic figures of the New German Cinema, paradoxically overlooked by official histories. Ottinger began working in film in the 1960s (during which time she studied photography, history and ethnology at the side of teachers including John Friedlaender, Claude Lévi-Strauss and Pierre Bourdieu), although she did not make her first film as a director until 1972, when she directed Laocoon & Sons with Tabea Blumenschein (Konstanz, 1952). The film premiered at the Deutsche Kinemathek in Berlin in 1973. With Madame X - Eine absolute Herrscherin (1977), a film about a female pirate, Ottinger revealed her interest in questions of gender, although in the 1980s she distanced herself from traditional feminist paradigms to interrogate the existence of a ‘female’ aesthetic, an alternative way of seeing the world, and begin to explore new discourses about identity. Her Berlin Trilogy marked a critical moment in this turn, since in it she tackled questions like androgyny and dandyism using a somewhat queer sensibility. From this point of view, Ottinger’s work has the special distinction of re-appropriating the aesthetics of narcissism from a feminist discourse, proposing a renegotiation of subjectivity and going beyond the more traditional debates in feminist theory on gender and sexuality.

  • 22 april, 2004
    Cinema and video Encounter

    Manuel Olveira (Puerto del Son, 1964), the director de Hangar, talks about the project Procesos abiertos, which was designed to draw attention to the production processes in contemporary art through a series of activities, a documentation centre and a blog. For six months (from January to July 2004) and with the participation of eleven artists, a support framework will be created in and with the public space, intended to be more of a network of relationships within a context than a physical framework.

  • Valie Export. Aus der Mappe der Hundigkeit, 1968
    1 march, 2004
    Cinema and video Encounter

    Valie Export (Linz, 1940) has, since the 1960s, served as a reference point for conceptual and feminist art with her reflections on identity, the use of the body and sexuality and its relation to the media. Her work, which is formally heterogeneous, spans film, video, performance art, photography, drawing and installations, formats that converge in a point of view that is radically opposed to the roles that the sexist conception inherent in western culture grants women.

  • Jill Sharpe. Culture Jam: Hijacking Commercial Culture, 2001
    27 february, 2004 - 8 march, 2004
    Cinema and video Festival

    Originally, hacker was a word that designated someone who made furniture using an axe. In the cyber world, however, it has acquired numerous meanings related to the world of artificial intelligence and its uses on the Internet, from the positive connotation when referring to a person who enjoys exploring programmable systems in great detail and how to expand their possibilities, to the unfavourable meaning used to refer to people who maliciously try to discover delicate information by manipulating programming systems. Hackers. The Art of Abstraction is a series of documentaries, conferences and performance pieces dedicated to the hacker phenomenon and culture that highlights some key questions that arose alongside the earliest appearances of computer ‘piracy’: Are the security systems guaranteed by large corporations and web servers really stable? To what extent can hacker practices be categorised as meaningless vandalism? What lies in these practices of civil disobedience?

  • 6 february, 2004
    Cinema and video Encounter

    What is the tunche? The tunche is a figure that has never been seen but is there. No visual representation of it exists, but it is imagined as a nocturnal bird. Its whistle is sweet and melancholy. When its whistle is short, it is a tormented soul that escorts; when it is long, it is an evil spirit that haunts, an omen of misfortune and death. Part of Peruvian folklore, the tunche is a feared and respected presence in the collective mindset.

  •  Trinh T. Minh-ha. Naked Spaces - Living is Round, 1985
    19 january, 2004 - 30 january, 2004
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This film and video programme presents the complete filmography of the Vietnamese filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha (Hanoi, 1952), one of the most forceful voices in post-colonial and post-feminist discourse in the 1980s and 90s. Born in Hanoi, she moved to the United States in 1970, where she studied music composition, ethnomusicology and French literature at the University of Illinois. Her film work has been highly recognised in the field of documentary, where she has adopted a critical ethnographic eye with respect to the narrative of the traditional documentary, which she deconstructs in her films. The technique of documentary film often contains the illusion of offering an objective and impartial look at the observed subject. The filmmaker, like the anthropologist, usually enjoys a privileged position, a distance above the observed subject that supposedly guarantees the neutrality of the process and the document. Part of Trinh T. Minh-ha’s work consists of challenging this proposition, revealing the strategies and methods used in the specific relationships between the documentary maker and the exploited or oppressed subjects who are observed in a hieratical power structure with an underlying authoritarian discourse about the ‘other’. In her films, meaning is constructed, not given. Thus she shows that commentary is not impartial, but rather an interpretation open to all its inherent complexity.

  • Sharon Lockhart. Nô, 2003
    13 november, 2003 - 19 december, 2003
    Cinema and video Film series Conference
  • Joan Rabascall. JFK, 1965
    30 october, 2003
    Cinema and video Encounter

    The work of Joan Rabascall (Barcelona, 1935), one of the Spanish artists who founded the Sociological Art movement in Paris in 1974, grapples with the messages contained in the manipulated media images that we are fed every day. Drawing on publicity, the press and television, he reveals the failures in the system through works with minimal decontextualisation and subsequent resignifying.

  • Edificio Sabatini, Auditorio
    26 september, 2003
    Cinema and video Encounter
  • Una breve historia del videoarte en Holanda. 30 años en la obra de 30 artistas
    17 july, 2003 - 27 july, 2003
    Cinema and video Film series

    A Brief History of Video Art in Holland is a video programme curated by Sebastián López, director of the Gate Foundation. It features the participation of 30 artists who are already prominent in the history of the audiovisual medium because of their important contributions, both to the development of video and to the issues that characterised the visual arts between 1972 and 2002. The exhibition charts the diversity and variety of the artists who have drawn the history of Dutch video art without constrictions in a medium supposedly without borders, opening up numerous cross-cultural connections and providing an open space for discussion where the artistic interrogates the cultural. The exhibition thus contributes to establishing new parameters to better understand the video work of the last three decades and the historical context in which these works were produced.

  • Edificio Sabatini, Auditorio
    4 june, 2003 - 22 june, 2003
    Cinema and video Film series

    Adolescents. Films and Videos for/about Girls and Boys is a programme of underground films that deal with the problems faced by adolescents and the challenges entailed in reaching the earliest years of adult life. Despite the difficulties involved in this vital phase for most people who experience it, as series curator Susana Blas notes, “we have gone from thinking of youth as an illness that is quickly cured to completely sublimating it. It seems that nobody wants to let go of this young way of living, which for many people has become a way of feeling, from being radical to just adopting their aesthetics and fashions. Today, you can find 40-year-old adolescents.” Drawing on this observation, the series is designed to break with the most perverse aspects involved in the sublimation of adolescence and unearth some of the clichés that have emerged around this difficult and venerated time of life. At the same time, it is introducing audiences to the work of a series of essential artists in the contemporary audiovisual world.

  • Kirby Dick y Amy Ziering Kofman. Derrida, 2002
    22 may, 2003 - 24 may, 2003
    Cinema and video Screenings Conference
  • Max Almy. Perfect Leader, 1983
    9 may, 2003 - 18 may, 2003
    Cinema and video Film series

    Focus: Video Library is a film and video exhibition created for the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía by the Galleria d'Arte Moderna (GAM) in Turin. The GAM has created a museum video collection, which could not be found in Italy until well into the 1990s, and has managed to build up a large collection of works that are now available to the public. The collection includes pieces by artists like Vito Acconci (New York, 1940), Dan Graham (Urbana, 1942), Marina Abramović (Belgrade, 1946) and Martha Rosler (New York, 1943) from the era when video was first being used as an art medium, works by John Baldessari (National City, 1931), Marcel Odenbach (Cologne, 1953) and Ana Mendieta (Havana, 1948 - New York, 1985) from the 1980s and more recent pieces from Sadie Benning (Madison, 1973) and Lydie Jean-Dit-Panel (Montbéliard, 1968). The selection also contains video works by young Italian artists, including Paolo Chiasera (Bologna, 1978) and Marcello Maloberti (Codogno, 1966), among others.

  • 7 march, 2003 - 3 april, 2003
    Cinema and video Film series

    With Single-channel, the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía presents a comprehensive review of the Spanish video created between 1996 and 2003, looking at 46 pieces that will be previewed on the museum façade during the days of the ARCO fair, along with the programme The Swiss Screen. The list includes some very well-known artists such as Txomin Badiola (Bilbao, 1957), Jordi Colomer (Barcelona, 1962) and Eulàlia Valldosera (Vilafranca del Penedès, 1963) alongside emerging figures who are being closely followed by audiences attuned to the latest trends such as Olga Adelantado (Valencia, 1970), Pilar Albarracín (Seville, 1968), Carles Congost (Olot, 1970), Dora García (Valladolid, 1965) and Fernando Sánchez Castillo (Madrid, 1970).

  • Emmanuelle Antille. Wouldn't It Be Nice, 1999
    10 february, 2003 - 17 february, 2003
    Cinema and video Film series

    How should a programme that is both personal and at the same time representative of Swiss art in the field of video be approached? How should the selection be organised given the particular context in which it will be presented, i.e., in the city of Madrid for a series of Swiss art events presented alongside ARCO 2003 and at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía?

  • Harun Farocki. Auge / Maschine I, 2001
    24 october, 2002 - 15 november, 2002
    Cinema and video Film series Conference
  • Edificio Sabatini, Auditorio
    3 june, 2002
    Cinema and video Encounter

     

  • Enlace-14
    27 may, 2002
    Cinema and video Film series
  • Portrait of Nam June Paik, Fine Art Rafael Vostell. © Fabrizio Garghetti
    10 may, 2002 - 7 july, 2002
    Cinema and video Festival
  • Stephen y Timothy Quay. In Absentia, 2000
    13 november, 2001 - 19 december, 2001
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    Film and Almost Film 2001 presents a selection of 22 works by experimental film directors and artists who, influenced by film and television, have taken a new approach to their work in an attempt to create a new genre of ‘art film’. This genre has traditionally been linked, both in terms of technique and narrative, to European experimental film, which, produced with low or medium budgets, has tried to reorient film practices and aesthetics. Nonetheless, in the last few years, the connotations inherent in the idea of ‘art film’ have grown.

  • Perry Bard. Interference, 2005
    31 may, 2001
    Cinema and video Encounter

    Interference is a programme of slides, documentaries and videos that tracks the evolution of the work by Perry Bard (Quebec, 1944) since she moved to New York in 1981. At the time, she was struck by the sight of homeless people sleeping in cardboard box shelters and the strong contrast with the surrounding sheets of glass and marble for which the city is known. Since then, Bard’s work has focused on the tenuous limits between public and private.

  • Pere Portabella. Vampir-Cuadecuc, 1971
    3 may, 2001 - 25 may, 2001
    Cinema and video Film series

    Historias sin argumento is a programme that presents the different stages in the filmography of Pere Portabella (Figueres, 1929) as a filmmaker and producer from the 1950s to today. His production company 59 Films was the driving force behind some of the cornerstone productions of Spain’s post-civil war critical realism (Los golfos, Carlos Saura; El cochecito, Marco Ferreri; Viridiana, Luis Buñel). At the end of the 1960s he was involved with the formation of the Barcelona School. His early films as a director, written in collaboration with the poet Joan Brossa (Barcelona, 1919-1998) (No compteu amb els dits and Nocturn 29), combine the cultural inheritance of the avant-garde with the languages that were coming onto the scene and shaking up the 1960s, and became known as ‘new cinema’. He was one of the key figures in the development of independent, alternative and clandestine cinema whose work was inextricably linked to his political opposition to Franco’s regime. Films like Vampir-Cuadecuc (1970), Umbracle (1971-1972) and his series of short films about Joan Miró (1969-1973), along with his participation in the Grup de Treball, were radical interventions in the cinema and art worlds.

  • Liliana Porter. For You / Para Usted, 1999
    5 february, 2001
    Cinema and video Encounter

    Liliana Porter (Buenos Aires, 1941) is the only female Latin American artist whose work is included in the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía’s audiovisual collection. For You/Para usted (1999) has its origins in a photographic series the artist did using toys and figurines going about their daily business, which Porter reformulated adding sound, rhythm and narration. From this point of view, the piece is closely connected to her earlier work in painting, drawing and photography, which already manifested the peculiar aspects of her personal narrative, far removed from traditional formulas. As Ana Tiscornia has noted, For You/Para usted is another step in the destabilisation of the conventional ideas of reality that prevails in Liliana Porter’s work. The video, originally shot in 16 mm, craftily uses the basic characteristics of the medium - emphasising time and movement - to present a scene that takes place almost completely off stage, in the mind of the viewer. In this presentation, Porter analyses her piece and illustrates the relationship between the video and the context of her work.

  • Edificio Sabatini, Auditorio
    2 february, 2001
    Cinema and video Encounter

    Inspired by the short story Beatles contra Duran-Duran, by the Cuban writer Mirta Yáñez (Havana, 1947), Madagascar (1994) by Fernando Pérez (Havana, 1944) revolves around the contradictions experienced by a university professor who has lost the ability to dream in Cuba during the 1990s economic crisis known as the ‘special period’ and her teenage daughter, who dreams of travelling to Madagascar. Their relationship, which is full of misunderstandings and mutual alienation, is depicted as an exercise in human communication. Its cinematic expressiveness, aesthetic pursuit and the humanity of its characters make Madagascar not only an innovative film, but also an important reading of the cinema of the times. This subtle story about the conflict between tradition and modernity has received numerous awards and distinctions, including the Special Jury Prize and Special Cuban Critics Prize at the 16th International Festival of New Latin American Cinema (1994) and the World Cinema Prize for Best Latin American Film at the 12th Sundance Film Festival.