List of selected artworks. Maps for the tour in the museum

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  • Jakoov A. Protazanov. Aelita, 1924
    20 december, 1997 - 28 december, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series

    The Film Machine. Mechanical Metaphors in Avant-Garde Film is a series of avant-garde films from the 1920s and 1930s relating to the impact of machines on the modern world and society, from the first European abstract and futurist experiments to Soviet propaganda films and American comedies, passing through pioneering science fiction films. The aim of this combination of narrative and experimental genres is to illustrate how the world of the machine inspired both the industry and avant-garde artists. The fascination first appeared in pioneering films by the Lumière brothers, Georges Méliès (Paris, 1861-1938), Segundo de Chomón (Teruel 1871- Paris 1929) and other anonymous artists, whose work introduces this series.

  • Mike Kelley y Paul McCarthy. Fresh Acconci, 1995
    29 october, 1997 - 22 november, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series

    The old concept of a person used to refer to oneself and to others is losing its meaning. Discourses as varied (and antagonistic) as science, religion, politics, philosophy and art indicate this movement clearly. This video programme features an orographic exploration and partial signposting of the terrain of video action, a perfect microcosm of what appears to be taking place on a different scale. Far from offering responses or interpretations, it aspires to contribute to the ruling confusion, adding new symptoms that speak equally of the generalised deterioration of these inescapably decomposing bodies.

  • Richard Serra y Nancy Holt. Boomerang, 1974
    1 october, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series

    The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía presents an anthological series divided into eight programmes on the first ten years of video as a means for artistic expression in the United States, an exhaustive look at its use in phenomenological and conceptual explorations. The First Decade in Perspective. Video Art and Alternative Media in the United States reflects attempts to establish a criticism of the North American television culture, to introduce new voices in the art world, and to capture experiments in the field of performance art, creating a new visual language.

  • Lodela, 1996. Coreografía: José Navas. Dirección: Philip Baylanc
    7 may, 1997 - 7 june, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    On the occasion of the International Dance Festival in Madrid, In Two Dimensions: Dance on the Screen is a series that features an international selection of film-video-dance dedicated to the auteur. The pieces included in the seven programmes in the series were made by renowned artists who present different ways to contemplate audiovisual creation, finding their partenaire in the choreographic arts. Choreographers and directors analyse, structure, observe and direct the viewer’s gaze through the body and the movement of performers who order/disorder ideas and feelings. Moreover, each is done in a personal way, paving often extremely divergent paths, where the relationship between the two resources materialises for very different reasons.

  • Jean Cocteau. La Sang d'un Poéte, 1930
    9 april, 1997 - 3 may, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    The series Of Blood, of Pleasure and of Death… presents a selection of experimental films with gay and lesbian themes designed to show some of the key pieces of avant-garde and underground film, putting them into context and in relation to the mass culture that generated them. The series title, in part inspired by the film trilogy by Gregory Markopoulos (Toledo, 1928 - Freiburg, 1992) Du sang, de la volupté et de la mort (1947-1948) acts as a metaphor for a series of films that, like the work by Markopoulos, see ‘blood, pleasure and death’ as an imaginary place where the desire, pain and the annihilation of the body are confronted and its being is oppressed by social norms and sexual taboos. The second part of the title, Some Films on ‘Sexual Disorientation’, in turn, relates to the confirmation of a fact: gay and lesbian film did ‘not’ exist before the 1970s or if it existed, it was limited to only two or three works. Given that the idea of a group or concept of gay and lesbian identity based on the term sexual ‘orientation’ did not exist (it emerged in the 1970s), this body of films cannot easily be described using those terms. This does not mean to say that there were no sexually ambiguous films suggesting ‘strange’ desires or ‘disoriented’ artists and filmmakers. Hundreds of films featured homosexual characters, but very few were made by homosexuals and even fewer had a gay or lesbian content.

  • Gordon Matta-Clark.  Splitting, 1974
    12 march, 1997 - 30 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This film and video series presents an overview of the film work of the North American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (New York, 1943-1978), an oeuvre that was largely forgotten for a long period of time. Beginning early in the 1970s until his death in 1978, Matta-Clark was one of the main driving forces on the New York SoHo art scene, characterised by his experiments aimed at breaking the limits that define an artwork, altering the structures established in the art world and exploding numerous means of artistic expression.

  • Peter Fordham. Yoko Ono y John Lenon filmando Imagine, 1970
    5 february, 1997 - 1 march, 1997
    Cinema and video Film series Conference

    This series is dedicated to the film work of Yoko Ono (Tokyo, 1933), sixteen films made between 1966 and 1982 that fill a unique space in the history of independent film in the United States. Yoko Ono participated in a general assault on film conventions during an extraordinarily creative period in American culture, during which directors developed alternative forms of production, distribution and exhibition. Coming from the same complex set of interdisciplinary experiences that inspired performance art and objects during those years, Ono’s films are like her songs (with their characteristic abstract expressivity) and like her artworks and sculptures because they too focus on materials in such a way that they expose the very phenomenon of perception.